“Drug Of Choice For Chancroid Chancroid Causative Agent”

Ecchymotic purple-brownish macule and a 1-cm nodule on the dorsum of the hand of a 65-year-old male of Ashkenazi-Jewish extraction. See a picture of Kaposi’s Sarcoma Ecchymotic and learn more about the health topic.

Jump up ^ Various (January 14, 2010). “Resources and Links, HIV-AIDS Connection”. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Archived from the original on April 7, 2010. Retrieved February 22, 2009.

Jump up ^ Hymes KB, Cheung T, Greene JB, et al. (September 1981). “Kaposi’s sarcoma in homosexual men-a report of eight cases”. Lancet. 2 (8247): 598–600. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(81)92740-9. PMID 6116083.

Jump up ^ Pillay, Deenan; Genetti, Anna Maria; Weiss, Robin A. (2007). “Human Immunodeficiency Viruses”. In Zuckerman, Arie J.; et al. Principles and practice of clinical virology (6th ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley. p. 905. ISBN 978-0-470-51799-4.

After this earliest stage of HIV infection, HIV continues to multiply but at very low levels. More severe symptoms of HIV infection, such as signs of opportunistic infections, generally don’t appear for many years. (Opportunistic infections are infections and infection-related cancers that occur more frequently or are more severe in people with weakened immune systems than in people with healthy immune systems.)

Sequencing revealed that variation occurs throughout the HIV genome but is especially pronounced in the gene encoding the gp120 protein. By constantly changing the structure of its predominant surface protein, the virus can avoid recognition by antibodies produced by the immune system. Sequencing also has provided useful insight into genetic factors that influence viral activity. Knowledge of such factors is expected to contribute to the development of new drugs for the treatment of AIDS.

HIV/AIDS; retrovirusScanning electron micrograph of HIV-1 virions (green) budding from a cultured lymphocyte. Multiple round bumps on the cell surface represent sites of virion assembly and budding.C. Goldsmith/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

HIV is a virus that attacks the immune system, which is our body’s natural defence against illness. The virus destroys a type of white blood cell in the immune system called a T-helper cell, and makes copies of itself inside these cells. T-helper cells are also referred to as CD4 cells.

Initially, some researchers referred to the syndrome as gay-related immune deficiency (GRID), since it appeared to be limited to homosexuals. In the media the disease commonly was referred to as the “gay plague.” But the disease had also been detected in intravenous drug users, who became infected mainly by sharing contaminated hypodermic needles. It also had been observed in women with male sexual partners. As a result, the term acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, was introduced to describe the disease; the CDC published its first report using the term in 1982.

In 1999, the WHO announced that AIDS was the fourth biggest cause of death worldwide and number one killer in Africa. An estimated 33 million people were living with HIV and 14 million people had died from AIDS since the start of the epidemic.70

In patients with HIV infection, certain syndromes are common and may require different considerations (see Table: Common Manifestations of HIV Infection by Organ Some patients present with cancers (eg, Kaposi sarcoma, B-cell lymphomas) that occur more frequently, are unusually severe, or have unique features in patients with HIV infection (see Cancers Common in HIV-Infected Patients). In other patients, neurologic dysfunction may occur.

Jump up ^ Aral, Sevgi (2013). The New Public Health and STD/HIV Prevention: Personal, Public and Health Systems Approaches. Springer. p. 120. ISBN 978-1-4614-4526-5. Archived from the original on September 24, 2015.

Jump up ^ Eaton, L; Kalichman, SC (November 2009). “Behavioral aspects of male circumcision for the prevention of HIV infection”. Current HIV/AIDS reports. 6 (4): 187–93. doi:10.1007/s11904-009-0025-9. PMC 3557929 . PMID 19849961.(subscription required)

Hurler’s syndrome; lipochondrodystrophy; dysostosis multiplex autosomal-recessive inherited generalized lipid disturbance and mucopolysaccharoidosis, affecting cartilage, bone, skin, subcutaneous tissues, brain, liver and spleen; characterized by short stature, shortness of neck, trunk and digits, kyphosis, reduced joint mobility, learning difficulties, characteristic facies (so-called gargoylism) and visual impairment

Genetic studies have led to a general classification system for HIV that is primarily based on the degree of similarity in viral gene sequence. The two major classes of HIV are HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is divided into three groups, known as group M (main group), group O (outlier group), and group N (new group). Worldwide, HIV-1 group M causes the majority of HIV infections, and it is further subdivided into subtypes A through K, which differ in expression of viral genes, virulence, and mechanisms of transmission. In addition, some subtypes combine with one another to create recombinant subtypes. HIV-1 group M subtype B is the virus that spread from Africa to Haiti and eventually to the United States. Pandemic forms of subtype B are found in North and South America, Europe, Japan, and Australia. Subtypes A, C, and D are found in sub-Saharan Africa, although subtypes A and C are also found in Asia and some other parts of the world. Most other subtypes of group M are generally located in specific regions of Africa, South America, or Central America.

Jump up ^ Yarchoan R, Tosato G, Little RF (2005). “Therapy insight: AIDS-related malignancies – the influence of antiviral therapy on pathogenesis and management”. Nat. Clin. Pract. Oncol. 2 (8): 406–415. doi:10.1038/ncponc0253. PMID 16130937.

The specific details of the disease process that leads to AIDS are not fully understood despite considerable progress in the virology of HIV and the immunology of the human host, much of which has been driven by the urge to better understand AIDS. [23, 24, 25] [redirect url=’http://penetratearticles.info/bump’ sec=’7′]

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