“All Stds +Anal Ulcers”

Dr. Michael Gottlieb, the lead author of the report and a renowned physician specializing in H.I.V./AIDS, treated Rock Hudson before he died of AIDS complications in 1985 and still practices in Los Angeles. Gottlieb said he is often asked why he didn’t include in that first report the documented case of the gay African-American man, who had both PCP and cytomegalovirus, a virus that attacks the organs of patients with compromised immune systems. He explains that he discovered the case after the report was finalized. “Until recently, I wouldn’t have thought it mattered,” said Gottlieb, who said that he and others on the front line were grappling with an unprecedented and frightening medical mystery and largely working in the dark. “But in retrospect, I think it might’ve made a difference among gay black men.”

When HIV gets resistant to one medicine, this is changed to another medicine. So the AIDS cocktail that people with AIDS take changes over time. But after a long time, the HIV learns to be resistant to many drugs. This is called multi-drug-resistant (acronym MDR) HIV. After the HIV in a person has MDR-HIV there may be no more medicines to treat them. So scientists keep trying to find new medicines to fight HIV. The five most important HIV medicines are:

^ Jump up to: a b “Today’s HIV/AIDS Epidemic Factsheet” (PDF). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. U.S. government. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 19, 2016. Retrieved December 31, 2016.

HIV is a virus spread through certain body fluids that attacks the body’s immune system, specifically the CD4 cells, often called T cells. Over time, HIV can destroy so many of these cells that the body can’t fight off infections and disease. These special cells help the immune system fight off infections. Untreated, HIV reduces the number of CD4 cells (T cells) in the body. This damage to the immune system makes it harder and harder for the body to fight off infections and some other diseases. Opportunistic infections or cancers take advantage of a very weak immune system and signal that the person has AIDS. Learn more about the stages of HIV and how to know whether you’re infected.

In this era of increasingly effective treatments for HIV, people with HIV are living longer, healthier, and more productive lives. Deaths from HIV infection have greatly declined in the United States since the 1990s. As the number of people living with HIV grows, it will be more important than ever to increase national HIV prevention and health care programs.

…highest rate of HIV and AIDS infection of any country in Asia. Aggressive programs launched by the government to promote safe sex practices, however, have reduced the rate of increase in new HIV infections significantly. Nonetheless, AIDS has continued to claim the lives of several tens of thousands of people…

In order for a person to be infected, HIV must be present in the transmitted body fluids, and its concentration (very high in blood) determines whether infection takes place. HIV must get into the blood stream and can only enter via an open cut or sore or by contact through the mucous membranes of the anus, rectum, genitalia, mouth or eyes. Outside the body HIV can live up to 15 days in a stable temperature and humidity, if it is in high concentration, but usually only for a short time (a few hours). It is not transmitted by insect bites, through saliva, tears, sweat, faeces or urine. There are documented cases of oral infection and male to female transmission is much more frequent than female to male. There are records of Simian immunodeficiency virus being transmitted to humans, but these have so far not given rise to the disease. The virus in chimpanzees can be transmitted but not similiar viruses from other animals.

If you believe you have been exposed to HIV, seek medical attention right away. DO NOT delay. Starting antiviral medicines right after the exposure (up to 3 days after) can reduce the chance that you will be infected. This is called post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). It has been used to prevent transmission in health care workers injured by needlesticks.

The transmission of HIV requires contact with a body fluid that contains the virus or cells infected with the virus. HIV can appear in nearly any body fluid, but transmission occurs mainly through blood, semen, vaginal fluids, and breast milk. Although tears, urine, and saliva may contain low concentrations of HIV, transmission through these fluids is extremely rare, if it occurs at all. HIV is not transmitted by casual contact (such as touching, holding, or dry kissing) or by close, nonsexual contact at work, school, or home. No case of HIV transmission has been traced to the coughing or sneezing of an infected person or to a mosquito bite. Transmission from an infected doctor or dentist to a patient is extremely rare.

Keating SM, Golub ET, Nowicki M, et al. The effect of HIV infection and HAART on inflammatory biomarkers in a population-based cohort of women. AIDS. 2011 Sep 24. 25(15):1823-32. [Medline]. [Full Text].

Because of the great efficacy of the protease inhibitors, it is possible to learn much about the kinetics of HIV replication in vivo by measuring the decline in viremia after the initiation of protease inhibitor therapy. For the first 2 weeks after starting treatment there is an exponential fall in plasma virus levels with a half-life of viral decay of about 2 days (Fig. 11.26). This phase reflects the decay in virus production from cells that were actively infected at the start of drug treatment, and indicates that the half-life of productively infected cells is similarly about 2 days. The results also show that free virus is cleared from the circulation very rapidly, with a half-life of about 6 hours. After 2 weeks, levels of virus in plasma have dropped by more than 95%, representing an almost total loss of productively infected CD4 lymphocytes. After this time, the rate of decline of plasma virus levels is much slower, reflecting the very slow decay of virus production from cells that provide a longer-lived reservoir of infection, such as dendritic cells and tissue macrophages, and from latently infected memory CD4 T cells that have been activated. Very long-term sources of infection might be CD4 memory T cells that continue to carry integrated provirus, and virus stored as immune complexes on follicular dendritic cells. These very long-lasting reservoirs of infection might prove to be resistant to drug therapy for HIV.

The human immunodeficiency virus-1 envelope protein gp120 was shown to induce apoptosis in hippocampal neurons, thus perhaps causing directly the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome dementia syndrome (for references, see Meucci et al., 1998). However, in the presence of either ABCD-1 or ABCD-3, human immunodeficiency virus-1 gp120-induced neuronal death was considerably slowed (Meucci et al., 1998).

The only drug in this class is T-20, which is administered as a twice-daily subcutaneous injection. The most common side effects are redness and pain at the site of injection. Rarely, infection can occur at the injection site. There also are reports of generalized allergic reactions.

The growth of AIDS in Africa and Asia has raised worries about global political and economic stability. Governments in these ravaged countries have not been able to afford the anti-viral drugs. In 2002 pharmaceutical companies agreed to sell these drugs to these countries as generic drugs, dropping the cost from $12,000 to $300 a year per patient; yet even at these prices many governments would be hard pressed to purchase them.

The findings in this report are subject to at least four limitations. First, missing CD4 test results could be caused by either incomplete reporting or not having had a CD4 test done. However, 89.4% of persons with HIV infection diagnosed in 2015 had a first CD4 test after diagnosis reported by June 2017. Second, adjustment for missing risk factors might be inaccurate if factors associated with these were not accounted for in the model. Third, NHBS is not a nationally representative sample, so results are not generalizable to all cities or to all groups at high risk in participating cities. Finally, behavioral data are self-reported and subject to social desirability bias.

^ Jump up to: a b Cheung, MC; Pantanowitz, L; Dezube, BJ (Jun–Jul 2005). “AIDS-related malignancies: emerging challenges in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy”. The Oncologist. 10 (6): 412–26. doi:10.1634/theoncologist.10-6-412. PMID 15967835.

A person gets HIV when an infected person’s body fluids (blood, semen, fluids from the vagina or breast milk) enter his or her bloodstream. The virus can enter the blood through linings in the mouth, anus, or sex organs (the penis and vagina), or through broken skin.

Malaria’s deleterious effects during pregnancy are substantially magnified by HIV, resulting in increased rates of maternal anemia and low-birth-weight infants.49 HIV infection is associated with moderately higher malaria parasitemia and greater risk of severe illness, particularly in adults. Additionally, malaria causes an increase in the HIV viral load that is reversed with malaria treatment. Although the clinical consequences of increased malaria parasitemia and HIV viral load may be limited for an individual patient, given the extensive geographic overlap between malaria and HIV, these effects may result in significant consequences at a population level.50

If you do inject drugs, never share your needles or works. Use only sterile needles. You can get them at many pharmacies without a prescription, or from community needle-exchange programs. Use a new sterile needle and syringe each time you inject. Clean used needles with full-strength laundry bleach, making sure to get the bleach inside the needle, soak at least 30 seconds (sing the “happy birthday” song three times), and then flush out thoroughly with clean water. Use bleach only when you can’t get new needles. Needles and syringes aren’t to be cleaned and reused, but it is better than sharing uncleaned needles and works.

Researchers are also trying to switch off a molecule called PD-1, which the body uses to restrain the immune system. Deactivating PD-1 has worked in clinical studies with melanoma and lung-cancer patients, and one patient seems to have been cured of hepatitis C by a single infusion of a PD-1 blocker from Bristol-Myers Squibb.

Gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) plays a role in HIV replication. [28] Although the portal of entry for HIV infection is typically through direct blood inoculation or exposure of the virus to genital mucosal surfaces, the GI tract contains a large amount of lymphoid tissue, making this an ideal site for HIV replication. [redirect url=’http://penetratearticles.info/bump’ sec=’7′]

One thought on ““All Stds +Anal Ulcers””

  1. According to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), [76] worldwide in 2015, approximately 36.7 million people (1% of the global adult population aged 15-49 years) were infected with HIV, a decline from 2006 (39.5 million reported at that time). UNAIDS estimates that approximately 2.1 million people were newly infected with HIV and that 1.1 million people died of AIDS in 2015, both statistics showing a decline over time.
    All of the arguments proposed by these dissenters have been addressed and rebutted in the scientific literature and public discussion and even tested and rejected in the legal system. Nevertheless, they persist, and such views can have extremely harmful effects on people who are exposed to HIV infection unnecessarily or who refuse treatment for their progressing infection.
    Benefits of treatment include a decreased risk of progression to AIDS and a decreased risk of death.[152] In the developing world treatment also improves physical and mental health.[153] With treatment there is a 70% reduced risk of acquiring tuberculosis.[149] Additional benefits include a decreased risk of transmission of the disease to sexual partners and a decrease in mother-to-child transmission.[149][154] The effectiveness of treatment depends to a large part on compliance.[29] Reasons for non-adherence include poor access to medical care,[155] inadequate social supports, mental illness and drug abuse.[156] The complexity of treatment regimens (due to pill numbers and dosing frequency) and adverse effects may reduce adherence.[157] Even though cost is an important issue with some medications,[158] 47% of those who needed them were taking them in low and middle income countries as of 2010[148] and the rate of adherence is similar in low-income and high-income countries.[159]
    The complications of HIV infection result mainly from a weakened immune system. The virus also infects the brain, causing degeneration, problems with thinking, or even dementia. This makes the person more vulnerable to certain types of conditions and infections (see Table 1). Treatment with ART can prevent, reverse, or mitigate the effects of HIV infection. Some patients on ART may be at risk for developing cholesterol or blood-sugar problems.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *