“Chlamydia Men +How Painful Is Chlamydia”

Having AIDS increases the risk of other cancers. They include cancer of the cervix, anus, testes, and lungs as well as melanoma and other skin cancers. Homosexual men are prone to developing cancer of the rectum due to the same human papillomaviruses (HPV) that cause cancer of the cervix in women.

And having herpes can also be a risk factor for contracting HIV. This is because genital herpes can cause ulcers that make it easier for HIV to enter the body during sex. And people who have HIV tend to have more severe herpes outbreaks more often because HIV weakens the immune system.

One way to measure the damage to your immune system is to count your CD4 cells you have. These cells, also called “T-helper” cells, are an important part of the immune system. Healthy people have between 500 and 1,500 CD4 cells in a milliliter of blood. Fact Sheet 124 has has more information on CD4 cells.

Poles MA, Boscardin WJ, Elliott J, et al. Lack of decay of HIV-1 in gut-associated lymphoid tissue reservoirs in maximally suppressed individuals. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2006 Sep. 43(1):65-8. [Medline].

Jump up ^ Plantier JC, Leoz M, Dickerson JE, De Oliveira F, Cordonnier F, Lemée V, Damond F, Robertson DL, Simon F (August 2009). “A new human immunodeficiency virus derived from gorillas”. Nature Medicine. 15 (8): 871–2. doi:10.1038/nm.2016. PMID 19648927.

HIV attaches to and penetrates host T cells, then releases HIV RNA and enzymes into the host cell. HIV reverse transcriptase copies viral RNA as proviral DNA. Proviral DNA enters the host cell’s nucleus, and HIV integrase facilitates the proviral DNA’s integration into the host’s DNA. The host cell then produces HIV RNA and HIV proteins. HIV proteins are assembled into HIV virions and budded from the cell surface. HIV protease cleaves viral proteins, converting the immature virion to a mature, infectious virion.

Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is the use of ARV drugs within 72 hours of exposure to HIV in order to prevent infection. PEP includes counselling, first aid care, HIV testing, and administration of a 28-day course of ARV drugs with follow-up care. WHO recommends PEP use for both occupational and non-occupational exposures and for adults and children.

The initial period following the contraction of HIV is called acute HIV, primary HIV or acute retroviral syndrome.[2][26] Many individuals develop an influenza-like illness or a mononucleosis-like illness 2–4 weeks post exposure while others have no significant symptoms.[27][28] Symptoms occur in 40–90% of cases and most commonly include fever, large tender lymph nodes, throat inflammation, a rash, headache, and/or sores of the mouth and genitals.[26][28] The rash, which occurs in 20–50% of cases, presents itself on the trunk and is maculopapular, classically.[29] Some people also develop opportunistic infections at this stage.[26] Gastrointestinal symptoms, such as vomiting or diarrhea may occur.[28] Neurological symptoms of peripheral neuropathy or Guillain–Barré syndrome also occurs.[28] The duration of the symptoms varies, but is usually one or two weeks.[28]

Jump up ^ Pritchard, Laura K.; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Seabright, Gemma E.; Cupo, Albert; Ringe, Rajesh; Kim, Helen J.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Doores, Katie J. (2015-06-16). “Structural Constraints Determine the Glycosylation of HIV-1 Envelope Trimers”. Cell Reports. 11 (10): 1604–1613. doi:10.1016/j.celrep.2015.05.017. ISSN 2211-1247. PMC 4555872 . PMID 26051934.

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under “Rare Disease Information”.

According to the August 2008 report issued by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), as of 2007, approximately 33 million people worldwide are HIV positive. Over half of the 33 million are women and this statistic has remained stable for several years. The highest number of cases found in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia.

Other tests can detect antibodies in body fluids other than blood, such as saliva, urine, and vaginal secretions. Some of these are designed to be rapid HIV tests that produce results in approximately 20 minutes. These tests have accuracy rates similar to traditional blood tests. OraQuick is an at-home test that uses an oral swab to detect HIV antibodies in oral fluid. Clearview is another rapid HIV test that can detect HIV antibodies in blood or plasma. HIV home-testing kits are available at many local drugstores. Blood is obtained by a finger prick and blotted on a filter strip. Other test kits use saliva or urine. The filter strip is mailed in a protective envelope to a laboratory to be tested. Results are returned by mail within one to two weeks.

Scientists believe the first human who got HIV was a person in Africa. This happened when Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) went from apes or chimpanzees to humans. This virus probably crossed to humans by contact with monkey blood while cutting up monkeys to eat.[2] Research in October 2014 shows that the virus started in Kinshasa during the 1920s.[2] It was quickly spread by sex workers, dirty needles used by doctors, and people using the railway to travel around the country.[2] Some people described the spread of the disease as a sexidemic (widespread).[3]

HIV/AIDS is a global pandemic.[207] As of 2016, approximately 36.7 million people have HIV worldwide with the number of new infections that year being about 1.8 million.[16] This is down from 3.1 million new infections in 2001.[208] Slightly over half the infected population are women and 2.1 million are children.[16] It resulted in about 1 million deaths in 2016, down from a peak of 1.9 million in 2005.[16]

^ Jump up to: a b c d Kumaranayake, L.; Watts, C. (2001). “Resource allocation and priority setting of HIV/AIDS interventions: addressing the generalized epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa”. Journal of International Development. 13 (4): 451–466. doi:10.1002/jid.797.

Jump up ^ Gallo RC, Sarin PS, Gelmann EP, Robert-Guroff M, Richardson E, Kalyanaraman VS, Mann D, Sidhu GD, Stahl RE, Zolla-Pazner S, Leibowitch J, Popovic M (1983). “Isolation of human T-cell leukemia virus in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)”. Science. 220 (4599): 865–867. Bibcode:1983Sci…220..865G. doi:10.1126/science.6601823. PMID 6601823. [redirect url=’http://penetratearticles.info/bump’ sec=’7′]

One thought on ““Chlamydia Men +How Painful Is Chlamydia””

  1. Pneumonia is inflammation of the lungs caused by fungi, bacteria, or viruses. Symptoms and signs include cough, fever, shortness of breath, and chills. Antibiotics treat pneumonia, and the choice of the antibiotic depends upon the cause of the infection.
    In communities with a relatively low prevalence of HIV, rapid testing can present certain logistic difficulties. With the traditional approach, testing would occur during an initial visit, and results would be provided during a follow-up encounter. That would give the health care professional an opportunity to arrange for an individual with expertise in posttest counseling to be available in a circumstance in which the health care professional knew that a patient was returning to receive a positive result. A program of testing and notification at the same visit does not allow the health care professional the luxury of notifying a counselor before a patient who is infected with HIV returns for a visit or of steering an individual who is infected with HIV to a certain session at which the counselor is routinely available. However, the obligation to make sure that appropriate counseling and support services are available still holds. Health care professionals should develop links with individuals who can provide those services on an emergent basis or train their own staff to handle the initial encounter and thereafter transition infected individuals to professionals who can serve as ongoing resources to them.
    There is evidence that humans who participate in bushmeat activities, either as hunters or as bushmeat vendors, commonly acquire SIV.[146] However, SIV is a weak virus, and it is typically suppressed by the human immune system within weeks of infection. It is thought that several transmissions of the virus from individual to individual in quick succession are necessary to allow it enough time to mutate into HIV.[147] Furthermore, due to its relatively low person-to-person transmission rate, it can only spread throughout the population in the presence of one or more high-risk transmission channels, which are thought to have been absent in Africa prior to the 20th century.
    Although the risk of clinician-to-patient transmission is extremely low, all infected physicians must make a decision as to which procedures they can continue to perform safely. This decision primarily will depend on the particular surgical technique involved and also on the physician’s level of expertise and medical condition, including mental status. The clinician’s decision should be made in consultation with a personal physician and may possibly involve such other responsible individuals as the chief of the department, the hospital’s director of infectious diseases, the chief of the medical staff, or a specialized advisory panel. If physicians avoid procedures that place patients at risk of harm, they have no obligation to inform the patient of their positive HIV serostatus. Physicians who are infected with HIV should follow standard precautions, including the appropriate use of handwashing, protective barriers, and care in the use and disposal of needles and other sharp instruments.
    During Millett’s decades in government and nonprofit organizations, he has combed through mounds of data about H.I.V./AIDS and black gay and bisexual men. Two years ago, he and his amfAR colleagues published a comprehensive report titled “H.I.V. and the Black Community: Do #Black(Gay)Lives Matter?” When the calm, usually sunny Millett, known for his bookish blue glasses and ready smile, talks about what he calls this “perfect storm,” his voice takes on a harder edge. “We are going to eventually end AIDS in the United States, but I fear it’s not going to happen for black M.S.M.,” he said, referring to men who have sex with men. “We have waited too long. With so many black gay men already infected, the horse is already out of the barn.”

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