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HIV disease becomes AIDS when your immune system is seriously damaged. If you have less than 200 CD4 cells or if your CD4 percentage is less than 14%, you have AIDS. See Fact Sheet 124 for more information on CD4 cells. If you get an opportunistic infection, you have AIDS. There is an “official” list of these opportunistic infections put out by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). The most common ones are:

HIV can be transmitted via the exchange of a variety of body fluids from infected individuals, such as blood, breast milk, semen and vaginal secretions. Individuals cannot become infected through ordinary day-to-day contact such as kissing, hugging, shaking hands, or sharing personal objects, food or water.

HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It is the virus that can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or AIDS if not treated. Unlike some other viruses, the human body can’t get rid of HIV completely, even with treatment. So once you get HIV, you have it for life.

Guidelines for prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections in HIV-infected adults and adolescents. National Institutes of Health. https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/guidelines/html/4/adult-and-adolescent-oi-prevention-and-treatment-guidelines/0. Accessed Dec. 15, 2017.

Dutch HIV-ziekte, humaan immunodeficiëntievirusinfectie, niet-gespecificeerd, HIV-infectie NAO, humaan immunodeficiëntievirussyndroom, HIV-ziekte; aandoening (als gevolg), HIV-ziekte; infectie, Humaan Immunodeficiëntievirus; ziekte, aandoening; HIV-ziekte (als gevolg van HIV-ziekte), aandoening; als gevolg van HIV-ziekte, immunodeficiëntievirus-ziekte; humaan, infectie; HIV-ziekte als oorzaak, Niet gespecificeerd ziekte door Humaan Immunodeficiëntievirus [HIV], HIV-infectie, HIV-infecties, HTLV-III-LAV-infectie, HTLV-III-infectie, Infecties, HIV-

Cryptococcal meningitis. Meningitis is an inflammation of the membranes and fluid surrounding your brain and spinal cord (meninges). Cryptococcal meningitis is a common central nervous system infection associated with HIV, caused by a fungus found in soil.

Brown’s cure was spectacular, but difficult to repeat. His doctor had twice destroyed all his native blood cells, with radiation and chemotherapy, and twice rebuilt his immune system with transplanted stem cells. It had been very dangerous and costly. Researchers wondered if they could create a scaled-down version. In 2013, physicians at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, in Boston, reported on the outcome of a study in which two H.I.V.-positive men on HAART had received bone-marrow transplants for lymphoma. Their marrow donors, unlike Brown’s, did not have the CCR5 mutation, and their chemotherapy regimen was less intensive. HAART was stopped a few years after the transplants, and the virus remained undetectable for months, but then resurfaced.

The earliest well-documented case of HIV in a human dates back to 1959 in the Congo.[243] The earliest retrospectively described case of AIDS is believed to have been in Norway beginning in 1966.[244] In July 1960, in the wake its independence, the United Nations recruited Francophone experts and technicians from all over the world to assist in filling administrative gaps left by Belgium, who did not leave behind an African elite to run the country. By 1962, Haitians made up the second largest group of well-educated experts (out of the 48 national groups recruited), that totaled around 4500 in the country.[245][246] Dr. Jacques Pépin, a Quebecer author of The Origins of AIDS, stipulates that Haiti was one of HIV’s entry points to the United States and that one of them may have carried HIV back across the Atlantic in the 1960s.[246] Although the virus may have been present in the United States as early as 1966,[247] the vast majority of infections occurring outside sub-Saharan Africa (including the U.S.) can be traced back to a single unknown individual who became infected with HIV in Haiti and then brought the infection to the United States some time around 1969.[248] The epidemic then rapidly spread among high-risk groups (initially, sexually promiscuous men who have sex with men). By 1978, the prevalence of HIV-1 among homosexual male residents of New York City and San Francisco was estimated at 5%, suggesting that several thousand individuals in the country had been infected.[248]

Jump up ^ Keele, B. F., van Heuverswyn, F., Li, Y. Y., Bailes, E., Takehisa, J., Santiago, M. L., Bibollet-Ruche, F., Chen, Y., Wain, L. V., Liegois, F., Loul, S., Mpoudi Ngole, E., Bienvenue, Y., Delaporte, E., Brookfield, J. F. Y., Sharp, P. M., Shaw, G. M., Peeters, M., and Hahn, B. H. (July 28, 2006). “Chimpanzee Reservoirs of Pandemic and Nonpandemic HIV-1”. Science. 313 (5786): 523–6. Bibcode:2006Sci…313..523K. doi:10.1126/science.1126531. PMC 2442710 . PMID 16728595.

On June 5, 1981, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published a report describing a rare lung infection known as Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in five homosexual men in Los Angeles. Expert review of the cases suggested that the disease likely was acquired through sexual contact and that it appeared to be associated with immune dysfunction caused by exposure to some factor that predisposed the affected individuals to opportunistic infection. The following month the CDC published a report describing an outbreak of cases of a rare cancer called Kaposi sarcoma in homosexual men in New York City and San Francisco. The report noted that in many instances the cancers were accompanied by opportunistic infections, such as P. carinii pneumonia. Researchers subsequently determined that the infections and cancers were manifestations of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

Testing for HIV is a two-step process involving a screening test and a confirmatory test. The first step is usually a screening test that looks for antibodies against the HIV. Specimens for testing come from blood obtained from a vein or a finger stick, an oral swab, or a urine sample. Results can come back in minutes (rapid tests) or can take several days, depending on the method that is used. If the screening HIV test is positive, the results are confirmed by a special test called a Western blot or indirect immunofluorescence assay test. A Western blot detects antibodies to specific components of the virus. The confirmatory test is necessary because the screening test is less accurate and occasionally will be positive in those who do not have HIV.

With regard to unprotected heterosexual contacts, estimates of the risk of HIV transmission per sexual act appear to be four to ten times higher in low-income countries than in high-income countries.[53] In low-income countries, the risk of female-to-male transmission is estimated as 0.38% per act, and of male-to-female transmission as 0.30% per act; the equivalent estimates for high-income countries are 0.04% per act for female-to-male transmission, and 0.08% per act for male-to-female transmission.[53] The risk of transmission from anal intercourse is especially high, estimated as 1.4–1.7% per act in both heterosexual and homosexual contacts.[53][54] While the risk of transmission from oral sex is relatively low, it is still present.[55] The risk from receiving oral sex has been described as “nearly nil”;[56] however, a few cases have been reported.[57] The per-act risk is estimated at 0–0.04% for receptive oral intercourse.[58] In settings involving prostitution in low income countries, risk of female-to-male transmission has been estimated as 2.4% per act and male-to-female transmission as 0.05% per act.[53]

Jump up ^ Hymes KB, Cheung T, Greene JB, Prose NS, Marcus A, Ballard H, William DC, Laubenstein LJ (September 1981). “Kaposi’s sarcoma in homosexual men-a report of eight cases”. The Lancet. 2 (8247): 598–600. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(81)92740-9. PMID 6116083.

At least once a week, I am asked by one of my HIV-infected patients whether they need to continue to practice safe sex if they are in a monogamous (one mate only) relationship with an HIV-infected partner. Put another way, since both partners already have HIV, what’s the harm of unprotected sex? Actually, this is not an easy question to answer fully.

The later stages of HIV infection are characterized by the progressive depression of T cells and repeated infections that can even occur during a course of antibiotic therapy for another infection (superinfections). People with AIDS are particularly vulnerable to “opportunistic infections” from bacteria that other people normally fight off. Pneumocystis carinii, which causes severe inflammation of the lungs (pneumonia), is a common infection that affects people with AIDS. Cancers (malignant neoplasms), and a wide variety of neurological abnormalities, most notably the AIDS dementia complex, may also occur. These neurological symptoms when of HIV, infects the nervous system.

Additionally, people with AIDS frequently have systemic symptoms such as prolonged fevers, sweats (particularly at night), swollen lymph nodes, chills, weakness, and unintended weight loss.[39] Diarrhea is another common symptom, present in about 90% of people with AIDS.[40] They can also be affected by diverse psychiatric and neurological symptoms independent of opportunistic infections and cancers.[41]

HIV is spread primarily by unprotected sex (including anal and oral sex), contaminated blood transfusions, hypodermic needles, and from mother to child during pregnancy, delivery, or breastfeeding.[12] Some bodily fluids, such as saliva and tears, do not transmit HIV.[13] Methods of prevention include safe sex, needle exchange programs, treating those who are infected, and male circumcision.[5] Disease in a baby can often be prevented by giving both the mother and child antiretroviral medication.[5] There is no cure or vaccine; however, antiretroviral treatment can slow the course of the disease and may lead to a near-normal life expectancy.[6][7] Treatment is recommended as soon as the diagnosis is made.[14] Without treatment, the average survival time after infection is 11 years.[15]

Alternative treatments for AIDS can be grouped into two categories: those intended to help the immune system and those aimed at pain control. Treatments that may enhance the function of the immune system include Chinese herbal medicine and western herbal medicine, macrobiotic and other special diets, guided imagery and creative visualization, homeopathy, and vitamin therapy. Pain control therapies include hydrotherapy, reiki, acupuncture, meditation, chiropractic treatments, and therapeutic massage. Alternative therapies also can be used to help with side effects of the medications used in the treatment of AIDS.

One interesting issue is that the co-receptor usage of the virus strains tends to change over time. The initial infection nearly always involves a strain that uses the chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), which is found on macrophages and dendritic cells, as a co-receptor with CD4. People who are homozygous for deletions in the CCR5 gene (ie, CCR5-delta32) tend to be resistant to infection, [46, 47] and those with heterozygosity for the polymorphism tend to show slower progression of disease. [48]

^ Jump up to: a b c Schneider, E; Whitmore, S; Glynn, KM; Dominguez, K; Mitsch, A; McKenna, MT; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, (CDC) (December 5, 2008). “Revised surveillance case definitions for HIV infection among adults, adolescents, and children aged <18 months and for HIV infection and AIDS among children aged 18 months to <13 years--United States, 2008". MMWR. Recommendations and reports : Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Recommendations and reports / Centers for Disease Control. 57 (RR–10): 1–12. PMID 19052530. Poles MA, Boscardin WJ, Elliott J, et al. Lack of decay of HIV-1 in gut-associated lymphoid tissue reservoirs in maximally suppressed individuals. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2006 Sep. 43(1):65-8. [Medline]. Most (95%) new infections occur in the developing world. Almost 70% of new HIV infections occur in sub-Saharan Africa, with more than half occurring in women and 1 in 10 occurring in children under 15 years old. However, in many sub-Saharan African countries, the number of new HIV infections decreased by 41% between 2000 and 2014., partly because of international efforts to provide treatment and strategies for prevention. Jump up ^ Chitnis A, Rawls D, Moore J (2000). "Origin of HIV type 1 in colonial French equatorial Africa?". AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 16 (1): 5–8. doi:10.1089/088922200309548. PMID 10628811. All sexually active adults should know their HIV status and should be tested for HIV routinely at least once. This is the only way to know whether one is HIV infected. It is not unusual for a person to get HIV from a person they never knew could have HIV; again, most people with HIV do not know it for years. Testing is important yearly or more often if a person has risk factors for HIV. If someone has a history of in unprotected sex outside of a mutually monogamous relationship (meaning both partners have sex only with each other) or sharing needles while using drugs, he or she should have an HIV test. Early testing, recognition of the signs and symptoms of HIV infection, and starting treatment for HIV as soon as possible can slow the growth of HIV, prevent AIDS, and decrease the risk of transmission to another person. If a woman is pregnant and infected with HIV, she can greatly reduce the risk to her unborn child by getting treatment. HIV testing is routinely offered at the first prenatal visit. Finkel TH, Tudor-Williams G, Banda NK, et al. Apoptosis occurs predominantly in bystander cells and not in productively infected cells of HIV- and SIV-infected lymph nodes. Nat Med. 1995 Feb. 1(2):129-34. [Medline]. Chun TW, Engel D, Berrey MM, Shea T, Corey L, Fauci AS. Early establishment of a pool of latently infected, resting CD4(+) T cells during primary HIV-1 infection. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1998 Jul 21. 95(15):8869-73. [Medline]. Once infection has progressed to AIDS, the survival period is usually less than 2 years in untreated patients. Persons in whom the infection does not progress long-term may not develop AIDS for 15 years or longer, although many still exhibit laboratory evidence of CD4 T-cell decline or dysfunction. [79, 80, 81, 82] Among persons interviewed through NHBS who were not tested in the past year, most MSM reported that their main reason for not testing was that they believed their risk for infection was low, whereas most persons who inject drugs and heterosexual persons at increased risk reported that they had no particular reason for not testing. In each risk group, at least two thirds of persons who did not have an HIV test had seen a health care provider in the past year (Table 2). Among those who had not tested in the past year and had visited a health care provider, approximately three quarters reported not having been offered an HIV test at any of their health care visits. [redirect url='http://penetratearticles.info/bump' sec='7']

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