“Female Chlamydia Symptoms _What Is Chlamydia Treatment”

Other important pathogens include cytomegalovirus, (which causes retinitis, pneumonitis, and colitis) and Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly known as Pneumocystis carinii; the causative organism in Pneumocystis pneumonia). In immunocompetent hosts, these organisms are generally nonpathogenic, and asymptomatic infection is common (and in the case of cytomegalovirus infection, life-long).

Human immunodeficiency virus uses chemokine receptors, mainly CXCR4 and CCR5, in conjunction with CD4 to infect healthy cells. The chemokine ligands to these receptors were found to block virus infection. Even though CCR4, the receptor for ABCD-1, is apparently not used by human immunodeficiency virus as coreceptor for infection, N-terminally processed human ABCD-1 showed human immunodeficiency virus suppressor activity independent of the viral phenotype (Pal et al., 1997; Struyf et al., 1998).

No effective cure currently exists, but with proper medical care, HIV can be controlled. The medicine used to treat HIV is called antiretroviral therapy or ART. If taken the right way, every day, this medicine can dramatically prolong the lives of many people infected with HIV, keep them healthy, and greatly lower their chance of infecting others. Before the introduction of ART in the mid-1990s, people with HIV could progress to AIDS in just a few years. Today, someone diagnosed with HIV and treated before the disease is far advanced can live nearly as long as someone who does not have HIV.

Sub-Saharan Africa is the region most affected. In 2010, an estimated 68% (22.9 million) of all HIV cases and 66% of all deaths (1.2 million) occurred in this region.[209] This means that about 5% of the adult population is infected[210] and it is believed to be the cause of 10% of all deaths in children.[211] Here in contrast to other regions women compose nearly 60% of cases.[209] South Africa has the largest population of people with HIV of any country in the world at 5.9 million.[209] Life expectancy has fallen in the worst-affected countries due to HIV/AIDS; for example, in 2006 it was estimated that it had dropped from 65 to 35 years in Botswana.[19] Mother-to-child transmission, as of 2013, in Botswana and South Africa has decreased to less than 5% with improvement in many other African nations due to improved access to antiretroviral therapy.[212]

In order for a person to be infected, HIV must be present in the transmitted body fluids, and its concentration (very high in blood) determines whether infection takes place. HIV must get into the blood stream and can only enter via an open cut or sore or by contact through the mucous membranes of the anus, rectum, genitalia, mouth or eyes. Outside the body HIV can live up to 15 days in a stable temperature and humidity, if it is in high concentration, but usually only for a short time (a few hours). It is not transmitted by insect bites, through saliva, tears, sweat, faeces or urine. There are documented cases of oral infection and male to female transmission is much more frequent than female to male. There are records of Simian immunodeficiency virus being transmitted to humans, but these have so far not given rise to the disease. The virus in chimpanzees can be transmitted but not similiar viruses from other animals.

HIV-2 is divided into groups A through E, with subtypes A and B being the most relevant to human infection. HIV-2, which is found primarily in western Africa, can cause AIDS, but it does so more slowly than HIV-1. There is some evidence that HIV-2 may have arisen from a form of SIV that infects African green monkeys.

In June, the first reports of AIDS in children hinted that it could be passed via casual contact but this was later ruled out and it was concluded that they had probably directly acquired AIDS from their mothers before, during or shortly after birth.17

Eukaryotic cells have mechanisms to prevent the export from the cell nucleus of incompletely spliced mRNA transcripts. This could pose a problem for a retrovirus that is dependent on the export of unspliced, singly spliced, and multiply spliced mRNA species in order to translate the full complement of viral proteins. The Rev protein is the viral solution to this problem. Export from the nucleus and translation of the three HIV proteins encoded by the fully spliced mRNA transcripts, Tat, Nef, and Rev, occurs early after viral infection by means of the normal host cellular mechanisms of mRNA export. The expressed Rev protein then enters the nucleus and binds to a specific viral RNA sequence, the Rev response element (RRE). Rev also binds to a host nucleocytoplasmic transport protein named Crm1, which engages a host pathway for exporting mRNA species through nuclear pores into the cytoplasm.

HIV is treated with antiretrovirals (ARVs). The treatment fights the HIV infection and slows down the spread of the virus in the body. Generally, people living with HIV take a combination of medications called HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy) or cART (combination antiretroviral therapy).

SjÖgren’s syndrome; sicca syndrome; keratoconjunctivitis sicca oral mucous membranes dryness, loss of lacrimal secretion, facial telangiectasias (i.e. butterfly rash), bilateral parathyroiditis (in younger women), strongly associated with rheumatoid arthritis and Raynaud’s phenomenon

Most (95%) new infections occur in the developing world. Almost 70% of new HIV infections occur in sub-Saharan Africa, with more than half occurring in women and 1 in 10 occurring in children under 15 years old. However, in many sub-Saharan African countries, the number of new HIV infections decreased by 41% between 2000 and 2014., partly because of international efforts to provide treatment and strategies for prevention.

As mentioned above, with regards to GALT, HIV infection may be compartmentalized; specifically, areas of immune-privilege may occur such as in the testes and central nervous system where not only will there be differences in HIV pseudospecies but also different degrees of antiretroviral drug penetration. There is evidence that even with good peripheral control of HIV, the virus still be detectable in the CSF and semen of some infected patients. [56, 57]

From the time of infection by HIV, AIDS normally develops within ten years, though there are now drugs which may be used to extend this time. The immune failure, which is characteristic of AIDS, occurs as a consequence of a gradual decline in the number of CD4 T lymphocytes. Eventually the infected person succumbs to a variety of infections by BACTERIA, FUNGI, protozoa or viruses and/or develops a cancer(s) such as Kaposi’s Sarcoma. [redirect url=’http://penetratearticles.info/bump’ sec=’7′]

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