“H Ducreyi _What Is A Bubo”

Definition (NCI_NCI-GLOSS) A disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). People with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are at an increased risk for developing certain cancers and for infections that usually occur only in individuals with a weak immune system.

AIDS is the most severe form of HIV infection. HIV infection is considered to be AIDS when at least one serious complicating illness develops or the number (count) of CD4+ lymphocytes decreases substantially.

Acronym for acquired immune deficiency (or immunodeficiency) syndrome; disorder of the immune system characterized by opportunistic diseases, including candidiasis, Pneumocystis jiroveci and others. Caused by the human immunodeficiency virus, which is transmitted in body fluids (notably breast milk, blood, and semen) through sexual contact, sharing of contaminated needles (by injecting drug abusers), accidental needle sticks, and contact with contaminated blood.

AIDS was first recognized in the United States 1981 in homosexual men. Today is seen in both homosexual and heterosexual men and women. AIDS is the advanced form of infection with HIV virus. This virus may not cause recognizable symptoms for a long period after the initial exposure (latent period). As of early 2009, no vaccine was available to prevent HIV infection. Until such a vaccine is developed, all forms of HIV/AIDS therapy are focused on improving the quality and length of life for people who are infected by slowing or halting the replication of the virus and treating or preventing infections and cancers that often develop in people with AIDS.

Although there is no HIV vaccine, HIV infections are entirely preventable through safe behaviour. Everyone has a responsibility to help prevent transmission of HIV and to take care of themselves and others. This means:

Since the first case was identified in 1981, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) has grown into an epidemic that has taken approximately 500,000 lives in the United States alone. The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS estimates that at the end of 2002 there were 42 million people living with HIV/AIDS worldwide. During 2002, AIDS caused the deaths of an estimated 3.1 million people. At this time, women were increasingly affected by AIDS; it was estimated that women comprised approximately 50 percent or 19.2 million of the 38.6 million adults living with HIV or AIDS worldwide. No cure has been found, although existing treatment employing multiple drugs has made some gains in prolonging life and reducing pain. Despite the limits of medical science, however, much is known about the disease. It is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Transmitted by bodily fluids from person to person, HIV invades certain key blood cells that are needed to fight off infections. HIV replicates, spreads, and destroys these host cells. When the body’s immune system becomes deficient, the person becomes AIDS-symptomatic, which means the person develops infections that the body can no longer ward off. Ultimately, a person with AIDS dies from diseases caused by other infections. The leading killer is a form of pneumonia.

…highest rate of HIV and AIDS infection of any country in Asia. Aggressive programs launched by the government to promote safe sex practices, however, have reduced the rate of increase in new HIV infections significantly. Nonetheless, AIDS has continued to claim the lives of several tens of thousands of people…

Treatment recommendations for children are somewhat different from those for adults. The World Health Organization recommends treating all children less than 5 years of age; children above 5 are treated like adults.[163] The United States guidelines recommend treating all children less than 12 months of age and all those with HIV RNA counts greater than 100,000 copies/mL between one year and five years of age.[164]

The closely related simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) has evolved into many strains, classified by the natural host species. SIV strains of the African green monkey (SIVagm) and sooty mangabey (SIVsmm) are thought to have a long evolutionary history with their hosts. These hosts have adapted to the presence of the virus,[90] which is present at high levels in the host’s blood, but evokes only a mild immune response,[91] does not cause the development of simian AIDS,[92] and does not undergo the extensive mutation and recombination typical of HIV infection in humans.[93]

Illness may not occur for months or years after untreated HIV infection. Without treatment, most adults will develop severe disease within 10 years of infection. Treatment of HIV with drug therapy has become much more effective in the past few years, prolonging life and increasing quality of life in people with HIV.

Jump up ^ Doitsh, Gilad; Galloway, Nicole L. K.; Geng, Xin; Yang, Zhiyuan; Monroe, Kathryn M.; Zepeda, Orlando; Hunt, Peter W.; Hatano, Hiroyu; Sowinski, Stefanie; Muñoz-Arias, Isa; Greene, Warner C. (2014). “Cell death by pyroptosis drives CD4 T-cell depletion in HIV-1 infection”. Nature. 505 (7484): 509–514. doi:10.1038/nature12940. PMC 4047036 . PMID 24356306.

“Terminal Velocity,” a 1994 film in which he played a skydiving instructor, fared even worse. Critics wondered whether the film was a goof, comparable to Sheen’s “Hot Shots!” parody series. It made just $17 million at the box office on a $50 million budget.

HIV is capable of rapidly mutating to escape recognition by certain HLA immune molecules as well as by cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which help to control HIV replication. Two forms of the HLA-B gene, known as HLA-B*51 and HLA-B*27, for example, produce immune molecules that are particularly susceptible to escape by HIV. The mutation of HIV to avoid those molecules is directly correlated to the frequency at which the HLA-B*51 and HLA-B*27 genes occur within populations. Thus, the percentage of HIV-infected individuals who carry a mutant virus capable of escaping immune detection by HLA-B*51 and HLA-B*27 molecules tends to be high in populations with high frequencies of the HLA-B*51 and HLA-B*27 genes. In contrast, in populations with the lowest frequencies of those genes, only a small percentage of HIV-infected individuals are infected with mutant virus.

Many HIV-positive people are unaware that they are infected with the virus.[103] For example, in 2001 less than 1% of the sexually active urban population in Africa had been tested, and this proportion is even lower in rural populations.[103] Furthermore, in 2001 only 0.5% of pregnant women attending urban health facilities were counselled, tested or receive their test results.[103] Again, this proportion is even lower in rural health facilities.[103] Since donors may therefore be unaware of their infection, donor blood and blood products used in medicine and medical research are routinely screened for HIV.[104]

Jump up ^ Liu JP, Manheimer E, Yang M (2005). Liu, Jian Ping, ed. “Herbal medicines for treating HIV infection and AIDS”. Cochrane Database Syst Rev (3): CD003937. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD003937.pub2. PMID 16034917.

Jump up ^ Chitnis A, Rawls D, Moore J (2000). “Origin of HIV type 1 in colonial French equatorial Africa?”. AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 16 (1): 5–8. doi:10.1089/088922200309548. PMID 10628811.

Scientists have also learned that if a city has a needle exchange program it will have fewer people who use illegal drugs. Needle exchange programs are where people can come in and trade dirty needles for clean needles. This means that if they use drugs they will be more safe. But needle exchange programs do more than give people clean needles. They teach people about drugs. If people want to stop using drugs, they help them.

Oral PrEP of HIV is the daily use of ARV drugs by HIV-negative people to block the acquisition of HIV. More than 10 randomized controlled studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of PrEP in reducing HIV transmission among a range of populations including serodiscordant heterosexual couples (where one partner is infected and the other is not), men who have sex with men, transgender women, high-risk heterosexual couples, and people who inject drugs.

HIV attacks the body’s immune system, specifically the CD4 cells (T cells), which help the immune system fight off infections. Untreated, HIV reduces the number of CD4 cells (T cells) in the body, making the person more likely to get other infections or infection-related cancers. Over time, HIV can destroy so many of these cells that the body can’t fight off infections and disease. These opportunistic infections or cancers take advantage of a very weak immune system and signal that the person has AIDS, the last stage of HIV infection.

HIV-positive patients who are taking anti-retroviral medications are less likely to transmit the virus. For example, pregnant women who are on treatment at the time of delivery transmit HIV to the infant about 5% of the time, compared to approximately 20% if medications are not used.

HIV can be transmitted to your baby during pregnancy. The virus can also be passed to your baby through breast milk. If your doctor knows you have HIV, treatment can lower the risk of passing the virus on to your child to less than 2 percent.

But these measures have not extended to most black gay and bisexual men. A C.D.C. report in February noted that only 48 percent of black gay and bisexual men effectively suppress the virus with consistent medication, and the numbers are even lower for these men in their late teens and 20s. In 2014, nearly one in five black gay men who had received a diagnosis of H.I.V. had progressed to AIDS by the time they learned of their infection — which meant that they were generally very ill by the time they began treatment. Only a small percentage of black people use PrEP to prevent contracting the virus, accounting for only 10 percent of prescriptions; the vast majority of users are white. Many black gay and bisexual men either can’t afford PrEP or don’t know about it — they may not see a doctor regularly at all, and many medical providers haven’t even heard of PrEP.

Combination NRTIs include tenofovir/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC. Truvada), emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide (TAF/FTC, Descovy), zidovudine/lamivudine (Combivir), abacavir/lamivudine (Epzicom), and abacavir/zidovudine/lamivudine (Trizivir).

Following decades of inadequate funding, our nation’s public health infrastructure lacks the resources it needs to respond aggressively to the HIV and AIDS epidemic. This arrangement has been devastating for members of the LGBTQ community, since the little funding that does exist for HIV prevention, treatment, and care has not been focused on or funded the communities most impacted by HIV. The Ryan White Care Program, for instance, has been flat funded (i.e, remained the same) since its reauthorization in 2009 despite an increasing number of people living with HIV in the U.S. coming to rely on it for medical and social suport. [redirect url=’http://penetratearticles.info/bump’ sec=’7′]

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