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A disease of the immune system due to infection with HIV. HIV destroys the CD4 T lymphocytes (CD4 cells) of the immune system, leaving the body vulnerable to life-threatening infections and cancers. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is the most advanced stage of HIV infection. To be diagnosed with AIDS, a person with HIV must have an AIDS-defining condition or have a CD4 count less than 200 cells/mm³ (regardless of whether the person has an AIDS-defining condition).

Plasma HIV virion levels, expressed as number of HIV RNA copies/mL, stabilize after about 6 mo at a level (set point) that varies widely among patients but averages 30,000 to 100,000/mL (4.2 to 5 log10/mL). The higher this set point, the more quickly the CD4 count decreases to a level that seriously impairs immunity (< 200/μL) and results in the opportunistic infections and cancers that define AIDS. Changes in survival of people infected with HIV. As therapies have become more aggressive, they have been more effective, although survival with HIV infection is not yet equivalent to that in uninfected people. Modified from an original published by Lohse et al (2007), "Survival of persons with and without HIV infection in Denmark, 1995-2005." The sexual practices with the highest risks are those that cause mucosal trauma, typically intercourse. Anal-receptive intercourse poses the highest risk. Mucous membrane inflammation facilitates HIV transmission; sexually transmitted diseases, such as gonorrhea, chlamydial infection, trichomoniasis, and especially those that cause ulceration (eg, chancroid, herpes, syphilis), increase the risk severalfold. Other practices that cause mucosal trauma include fisting (inserting most or all of the hand into the rectum or vagina) and using sexual toys. When used during intercourse with an HIV-infected partner and/or with multiple concurrent sex partners, these practices increase the risk of HIV transmission. HIV also infects nonlymphoid monocytic cells (eg, dendritic cells in the skin, macrophages, brain microglia) and cells of the brain, genital tract, heart, and kidneys, causing disease in the corresponding organ systems. The mortality rate in some countries has greatly increased. In South Africa (a country that, despite having a relatively late-onset HIV epidemic, has developed one of the highest prevalence rates), the all-cause HIV-associated mortality rate increased by 79% between 1997 and 2004. In women aged 25-34 years, mortality rates increased by 500% during this period. There are more than 25 medications in six drug classes approved to treat HIV. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recommends a starting regimen of three HIV medicines from at least two drug classes. HIV-associated neurologic syndromes can be differentiated via lumbar puncture with CSF analysis and contrast-enhanced CT or MRI (see Table: Common Manifestations of HIV Infection by Organ System and elsewhere in The Manual). Visible effects of HIV infection come in the form of disrupted lymph-node architecture. This disruption is temporal, and, at one point, lymph-node biopsy was considered as a form of staging the disease. [54, 55] The disruption of the follicular dendritic network in the lymph nodes and subsequent failure of normal antigen presentation are likely contributors to the disease process. People with HIV infection should be under the care of a physician who is experienced in treating HIV infection. This is often an infectious-disease subspecialist, but may be a health-care provider, such as an internal medicine or pediatric specialist, who has special certification in HIV treatment. All people with HIV should be counseled about avoiding the spread of the disease. Infected individuals are also educated about the disease process, and attempts are made to improve the quality of their life. Hungarian Szerzett immunhiány syndromák, AIDS, szerzett immunhiány szindróma k.m.n., Szerzett immunhiány szindróma, Szerzett immunhiány szindróma, nem meghatározott, Autoimmun hiány-syndroma, szerzett immunhiányos szindróma If a person has been exposed to the virus, it is crucial that they get tested as soon as possible. The earlier HIV is detected, the more likely the treatment will be successful. A home testing kit can be used as well. The use of mother-to-child transmission prevention strategies is another important strand of AIDS prevention programmes. In South Africa, for example, expansion of the strategy has resulted in the mother-to-child transmission rate falling to 3.5%.[21] GALT has been shown to be a site of early viral seeding and establishment of the proviral reservoir. This reservoir contributes to the difficulty of controlling the infection, and efforts to reduce the levels of HIV provirus through sustained antiretroviral therapy (alone or in combination with interleukin-2 activation of resting HIV-infected T cells) have consistently failed. [29] "In the early stages of HIV infection, the most common symptoms are none," says Michael Horberg, MD, director of HIV/AIDS for Kaiser Permanente, in Oakland, Calif. One in five people in the United States with HIV doesn't know they have it, which is why it's so important to get tested, especially if you have unprotected sex with more than one partner or use intravenous drugs. Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is the use of ARV drugs within 72 hours of exposure to HIV in order to prevent infection. PEP includes counselling, first aid care, HIV testing, and administration of a 28-day course of ARV drugs with follow-up care. WHO recommends PEP use for both occupational and non-occupational exposures and for adults and children. Tuberculosis co-infection is one of the leading causes of sickness and death in those with HIV/AIDS being present in a third of all HIV-infected people and causing 25% of HIV-related deaths.[196] HIV is also one of the most important risk factors for tuberculosis.[197] Hepatitis C is another very common co-infection where each disease increases the progression of the other.[198] The two most common cancers associated with HIV/AIDS are Kaposi's sarcoma and AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.[191] Other cancers that are more frequent include anal cancer, Burkitt's lymphoma, primary central nervous system lymphoma, and cervical cancer.[29][199] Bandera A, Ferrario G, Saresella M, et al. CD4+ T cell depletion, immune activation and increased production of regulatory T cells in the thymus of HIV-infected individuals. PLoS One. 2010 May 24. 5(5):e10788. [Medline]. [Full Text]. a disease of the immune system characterized by increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, to certain cancers, and to neurological disorders: caused by a retrovirus and transmitted chiefly through blood or blood products that enter the body's bloodstream, esp. by sexual contact or contaminated hypodermic needles. Scientists who study (look at and learn about) people who use condoms, see that if teenagers (children 13–19) learn about condoms (and other birth control) they have less unsafe sex. Scientists see that learning about these things does not make teenagers start having sex earlier. The teenagers also have safer sex. Safer sex means doing things (like wearing condoms) to try not to get pregnant or get sexually transmitted diseases (STDs or STIs) like HIV, gonorrhea, and syphilis. Using a condom works very well for keeping people from getting pregnant or getting STDs if people know how to use a condom the right way.[1] [2] The findings in this report are subject to at least four limitations. First, missing CD4 test results could be caused by either incomplete reporting or not having had a CD4 test done. However, 89.4% of persons with HIV infection diagnosed in 2015 had a CD4 test after diagnosis reported by June 2017. Second, adjustment for missing risk factors might be inaccurate if factors associated with these were not accounted for in the model. Third, NHBS is not a nationally representative sample, so results are not generalizable to all cities or to all groups at high risk in participating cities. Finally, behavioral data are self-reported and subject to social desirability bias. The majority of people on HIV treatment in countries like Australia will have long-term suppression of symptoms and a reduced viral load. Without HIV treatment people with HIV may develop AIDS and die from infections, cancers and other illnesses the immune system can no longer fight. Survival rates have dramatically improved for those individuals using protease inhibitors, but other problems have also arisen. Some persons do not respond to these medications or the side effects from taking the drugs diminish the quality of life. Protease inhibitors, for many people, are intolerable because of nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, headache, kidney stones, and serious drug interactions with other medications. By 2003 researchers had found that serious side effects include increased risk of heart attack, abnormalities in fat distribution, an increased propensity toward diabetes, and abnormalities in cholesterol metabolism. One morning in the winter of 1981, my wife came home after her on-call shift at the U.C.L.A. Medical Center and told me about a baffling new case. Queenie was an eighteen-year-old prostitute, his hair dyed the color of brass. He had arrived at the emergency room with a high fever and a cough, and appeared to have a routine kind of pneumonia, readily treated with antibiotics. But the medical team retrieved a microbe from his lungs called Pneumocystis carinii. The microbe was known for causing a rare fungal pneumonia that had been seen in severely malnourished children and in adults undergoing organ transplants or chemotherapy. Guttmacher Institute. An overview of minors’ consent law. State Policies in Brief. New York (NY): GI; 2013. Available at: http://www.guttmacher.org/statecenter/spibs/spib_OMCL.pdf. Retrieved November 4, 2013. ⇦ All products and services featured are selected by our editors. Health.com may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice. © 2017 Health Media Ventures, Inc. Health.com is part of the Time Inc. Food Collection and the MyRecipes Network. All rights reserved. The material in this site is intended to be of general informational use and is not intended to constitute medical advice, probable diagnosis, or recommended treatments. See the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy (Your California Rights)for more information. Ad Choices Scientists identified a type of chimpanzee in Central Africa as the source of HIV infection in humans. They believe that the chimpanzee version of the immunodeficiency virus (called simian immunodeficiency virus, or SIV) most likely was transmitted to humans and mutated into HIV when humans hunted these chimpanzees for meat and came into contact with their infected blood. Studies show that HIV may have jumped from apes to humans as far back as the late 1800s. Over decades, the virus slowly spread across Africa and later into other parts of the world. We know that the virus has existed in the United States since at least the mid to late 1970s. To learn more about the spread of HIV in the United States and CDC’s response to the epidemic, see CDC’s HIV and AIDS Timeline. Jump up ^ "Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents" (pdf). Department of Health and Human Services. February 12, 2013. p. i. Archived (PDF) from the original on November 1, 2016. Retrieved January 3, 2014. Weinhardt LS, Carey MP, Johnson BT, Bickham NL. Effects of HIV counseling and testing on sexual risk behavior: a meta-analytic review of published research, 1985–1997. Am J Public Health 1999;89:1397–405. [PubMed] [Full Text] ⇦ Jump up ^ Olson, WC; Jacobson, JM (March 2009). "CCR5 monoclonal antibodies for HIV-1 therapy". Current Opinion in HIV and AIDS. 4 (2): 104–11. doi:10.1097/COH.0b013e3283224015. PMC 2760828 . PMID 19339948. Another sign of late HIV infection are nail changes, such as clubbing (thickening and curving of the nails), splitting of the nails, or discoloration (black or brown lines going either vertically or horizontally). Hurler's syndrome; lipochondrodystrophy; dysostosis multiplex autosomal-recessive inherited generalized lipid disturbance and mucopolysaccharoidosis, affecting cartilage, bone, skin, subcutaneous tissues, brain, liver and spleen; characterized by short stature, shortness of neck, trunk and digits, kyphosis, reduced joint mobility, learning difficulties, characteristic facies (so-called gargoylism) and visual impairment Jump up ^ Baggaley RF, White RG, Boily MC (December 2008). "Systematic review of orogenital HIV-1 transmission probabilities". International Journal of Epidemiology. 37 (6): 1255–65. doi:10.1093/ije/dyn151. PMC 2638872 . PMID 18664564. Two types of HIV have been characterized: HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is the virus that was initially discovered and termed both LAV (Lymphadenopathy Associated Virus) and HTLV-III (Human T cell Lymphotropic Virus III). HIV-1 is more virulent and more infective than HIV-2,[17] and is the cause of the majority of HIV infections globally. The lower infectivity of HIV-2 compared to HIV-1 implies that fewer of those exposed to HIV-2 will be infected per exposure. Due to its relatively poor capacity for transmission, HIV-2 is largely confined to West Africa.[18] [redirect url='http://penetratearticles.info/bump' sec='7']

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